In OKD version 4, you can install a cluster on Microsoft Azure Stack Hub by using infrastructure that you provide.

Several Azure Resource Manager (ARM) templates are provided to assist in completing these steps or to help model your own.

The steps for performing a user-provisioned infrastructure installation are provided as an example only. Installing a cluster with infrastructure you provide requires knowledge of the cloud provider and the installation process of OKD. Several ARM templates are provided to assist in completing these steps or to help model your own. You are also free to create the required resources through other methods; the templates are just an example.

You can only install OKD on Azure Stack Hub with public endpoints, such as the ARM endpoint, that are secured with certificates signed by a publicly trusted certificate authority (CA). Support for internal CAs will be added in a future z-stream release of OKD. (BZ#2012173)

Prerequisites

Configuring your Azure Stack Hub project

Before you can install OKD, you must configure an Azure project to host it.

All Azure Stack Hub resources that are available through public endpoints are subject to resource name restrictions, and you cannot create resources that use certain terms. For a list of terms that Azure Stack Hub restricts, see Resolve reserved resource name errors in the Azure documentation.

Azure Stack Hub account limits

The OKD cluster uses a number of Microsoft Azure Stack Hub components, and the default Quota types in Azure Stack Hub affect your ability to install OKD clusters.

The following table summarizes the Azure Stack Hub components whose limits can impact your ability to install and run OKD clusters.

Component Number of components required by default Description

vCPU

56

A default cluster requires 56 vCPUs, so you must increase the account limit.

By default, each cluster creates the following instances:

  • One bootstrap machine, which is removed after installation

  • Three control plane machines

  • Three compute machines

Because the bootstrap, control plane, and worker machines use Standard_DS4_v2 virtual machines, which use 8 vCPUs, a default cluster requires 56 vCPUs. The bootstrap node VM is used only during installation.

To deploy more worker nodes, enable autoscaling, deploy large workloads, or use a different instance type, you must further increase the vCPU limit for your account to ensure that your cluster can deploy the machines that you require.

OS Disk

7

VM OS disk must be able to sustain a minimum throughput of 5000 IOPS / 200MBps. This throughput can be provided by having a minimum of 1 TiB Premium SSD (P30). In Azure Stack Hub, disk performance is directly dependent on SSD disk sizes, so to achieve the throughput supported by Standard_DS4_v2, or other similar machine types available, and the target of 5000 IOPS, at least a P30 disk is required.

Host caching must be set to ReadOnly for low read latency and high read IOPS and throughput. The reads performed from the cache, which is present either in the VM memory or in the local SSD disk, are much faster than the reads from the data disk, which is in the blob storage.

VNet

1

Each default cluster requires one Virtual Network (VNet), which contains two subnets.

Network interfaces

7

Each default cluster requires seven network interfaces. If you create more machines or your deployed workloads create load balancers, your cluster uses more network interfaces.

Network security groups

2

Each cluster creates network security groups for each subnet in the VNet. The default cluster creates network security groups for the control plane and for the compute node subnets:

controlplane

Allows the control plane machines to be reached on port 6443 from anywhere

node

Allows worker nodes to be reached from the internet on ports 80 and 443

Network load balancers

3

Each cluster creates the following load balancers:

default

Public IP address that load balances requests to ports 80 and 443 across worker machines

internal

Private IP address that load balances requests to ports 6443 and 22623 across control plane machines

external

Public IP address that load balances requests to port 6443 across control plane machines

If your applications create more Kubernetes LoadBalancer service objects, your cluster uses more load balancers.

Public IP addresses

2

The public load balancer uses a public IP address. The bootstrap machine also uses a public IP address so that you can SSH into the machine to troubleshoot issues during installation. The IP address for the bootstrap node is used only during installation.

Private IP addresses

7

The internal load balancer, each of the three control plane machines, and each of the three worker machines each use a private IP address.

Configuring a DNS zone in Azure Stack Hub

To successfully install OKD on Azure Stack Hub, you must create DNS records in an Azure Stack Hub DNS zone. The DNS zone must be authoritative for the domain. To delegate a registrar’s DNS zone to Azure Stack Hub, see Microsoft’s documentation for Azure Stack Hub datacenter DNS integration.

You can view Azure’s DNS solution by visiting this example for creating DNS zones.

Certificate signing requests management

Because your cluster has limited access to automatic machine management when you use infrastructure that you provision, you must provide a mechanism for approving cluster certificate signing requests (CSRs) after installation. The kube-controller-manager only approves the kubelet client CSRs. The machine-approver cannot guarantee the validity of a serving certificate that is requested by using kubelet credentials because it cannot confirm that the correct machine issued the request. You must determine and implement a method of verifying the validity of the kubelet serving certificate requests and approving them.

Required Azure Stack Hub roles

Your Microsoft Azure Stack Hub account must have the following roles for the subscription that you use:

  • Owner

To set roles on the Azure portal, see the Manage access to resources in Azure Stack Hub with role-based access control in the Microsoft documentation.

Creating a service principal

Because OKD and its installation program must create Microsoft Azure resources through Azure Resource Manager, you must create a service principal to represent it.

Prerequisites
  • Install or update the Azure CLI.

  • Install the jq package.

  • Your Azure account has the required roles for the subscription that you use.

Procedure
  1. Register your Azure Stack Cloud environment with your Azure CLI. For more details on this process, see Microsoft’s documentation for Connecting to Azure Stack Hub.

    1. Register your environment with the Azure CLI:

      $ az cloud register -n <environment_name> --endpoint-resource-manager <arm_endpoint>
    2. Set the active environment:

      $ az cloud set -n <environment_name>
    3. Update your environment configuration to use the specific API version for Azure Stack Hub:

      $ az cloud update --profile 2019-03-01-hybrid
  2. Log in to the Azure CLI:

    $ az login

    Log in to Azure in the web console by using your credentials. If you are in a multitenant environment, you must also supply the tenant ID.

  3. If your Azure account uses subscriptions, ensure that you are using the right subscription.

    1. View the list of available accounts and record the tenantId value for the subscription you want to use for your cluster:

      $ az account list --refresh
      Example output
      [
        {
          "cloudName": AzureStackCloud",
          "id": "9bab1460-96d5-40b3-a78e-17b15e978a80",
          "isDefault": true,
          "name": "Subscription Name",
          "state": "Enabled",
          "tenantId": "6057c7e9-b3ae-489d-a54e-de3f6bf6a8ee",
          "user": {
            "name": "you@example.com",
            "type": "user"
          }
        }
      ]
    2. View your active account details and confirm that the tenantId value matches the subscription you want to use:

      $ az account show
      Example output
      {
        "environmentName": AzureStackCloud",
        "id": "9bab1460-96d5-40b3-a78e-17b15e978a80",
        "isDefault": true,
        "name": "Subscription Name",
        "state": "Enabled",
        "tenantId": "6057c7e9-b3ae-489d-a54e-de3f6bf6a8ee", (1)
        "user": {
          "name": "you@example.com",
          "type": "user"
        }
      }
      1 Ensure that the value of the tenantId parameter is the UUID of the correct subscription.
    3. If you are not using the right subscription, change the active subscription:

      $ az account set -s <id> (1)
      1 Substitute the value of the id for the subscription that you want to use for <id>.
    4. If you changed the active subscription, display your account information again:

      $ az account show
      Example output
      {
        "environmentName": AzureStackCloud",
        "id": "33212d16-bdf6-45cb-b038-f6565b61edda",
        "isDefault": true,
        "name": "Subscription Name",
        "state": "Enabled",
        "tenantId": "8049c7e9-c3de-762d-a54e-dc3f6be6a7ee",
        "user": {
          "name": "you@example.com",
          "type": "user"
        }
      }
  4. Record the values of the tenantId and id parameters from the previous output. You need these values during OKD installation.

  5. Create the service principal for your account:

    $ az ad sp create-for-rbac --role Contributor --name <service_principal> (1)
    1 Replace <service_principal> with the name to assign to the service principal.
    Example output
    Changing "<service_principal>" to a valid URI of "http://<service_principal>", which is the required format used for service principal names
    Retrying role assignment creation: 1/36
    Retrying role assignment creation: 2/36
    Retrying role assignment creation: 3/36
    Retrying role assignment creation: 4/36
    {
      "appId": "8bd0d04d-0ac2-43a8-928d-705c598c6956",
      "displayName": "<service_principal>",
      "name": "http://<service_principal>",
      "password": "ac461d78-bf4b-4387-ad16-7e32e328aec6",
      "tenant": "6048c7e9-b2ad-488d-a54e-dc3f6be6a7ee"
    }
  6. Record the values of the appId and password parameters from the previous output. You need these values during OKD installation.

Additional resources

Obtaining the installation program

Before you install OKD, download the installation file on a local computer.

Prerequisites
  • You have a computer that runs Linux or macOS, with 500 MB of local disk space

Procedure
  1. Download installer from https://github.com/openshift/okd/releases

    The installation program creates several files on the computer that you use to install your cluster. You must keep the installation program and the files that the installation program creates after you finish installing the cluster. Both files are required to delete the cluster.

    Deleting the files created by the installation program does not remove your cluster, even if the cluster failed during installation. To remove your cluster, complete the OKD uninstallation procedures for your specific cloud provider.

  2. Extract the installation program. For example, on a computer that uses a Linux operating system, run the following command:

    $ tar -xvf openshift-install-linux.tar.gz
  3. From the Pull Secret page on the Red Hat OpenShift Cluster Manager site, download your installation pull secret. This pull secret allows you to authenticate with the services that are provided by the included authorities, including Quay.io, which serves the container images for OKD components.

    Using a pull secret from the Red Hat OpenShift Cluster Manager site is not required. You can use a pull secret for another private registry. Or, if you do not need the cluster to pull images from a private registry, you can use {"auths":{"fake":{"auth":"aWQ6cGFzcwo="}}} as the pull secret when prompted during the installation.

    If you do not use the pull secret from the Red Hat OpenShift Cluster Manager site:

    • Red Hat Operators are not available.

    • The Telemetry and Insights operators do not send data to Red Hat.

    • Content from the Red Hat Ecosystem Catalog Container images registry, such as image streams and Operators, are not available.

Generating a key pair for cluster node SSH access

During an OKD installation, you can provide an SSH public key to the installation program. The key is passed to the Fedora CoreOS (FCOS) nodes through their Ignition config files and is used to authenticate SSH access to the nodes. The key is added to the ~/.ssh/authorized_keys list for the core user on each node, which enables password-less authentication.

After the key is passed to the nodes, you can use the key pair to SSH in to the FCOS nodes as the user core. To access the nodes through SSH, the private key identity must be managed by SSH for your local user.

If you want to SSH in to your cluster nodes to perform installation debugging or disaster recovery, you must provide the SSH public key during the installation process. The ./openshift-install gather command also requires the SSH public key to be in place on the cluster nodes.

Do not skip this procedure in production environments, where disaster recovery and debugging is required.

You must use a local key, not one that you configured with platform-specific approaches such as AWS key pairs.

On clusters running Fedora CoreOS (FCOS), the SSH keys specified in the Ignition config files are written to the /home/core/.ssh/authorized_keys.d/core file. However, the Machine Config Operator manages SSH keys in the /home/core/.ssh/authorized_keys file and configures sshd to ignore the /home/core/.ssh/authorized_keys.d/core file. As a result, newly provisioned OKD nodes are not accessible using SSH until the Machine Config Operator reconciles the machine configs with the authorized_keys file. After you can access the nodes using SSH, you can delete the /home/core/.ssh/authorized_keys.d/core file.

Procedure
  1. If you do not have an existing SSH key pair on your local machine to use for authentication onto your cluster nodes, create one. For example, on a computer that uses a Linux operating system, run the following command:

    $ ssh-keygen -t ed25519 -N '' -f <path>/<file_name> (1)
    1 Specify the path and file name, such as ~/.ssh/id_rsa, of the new SSH key. If you have an existing key pair, ensure your public key is in the your ~/.ssh directory.

    If you plan to install an OKD cluster that uses FIPS Validated / Modules in Process cryptographic libraries on the x86_64 architecture, do not create a key that uses the ed25519 algorithm. Instead, create a key that uses the rsa or ecdsa algorithm.

  2. View the public SSH key:

    $ cat <path>/<file_name>.pub

    For example, run the following to view the ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub public key:

    $ cat ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub
  3. Add the SSH private key identity to the SSH agent for your local user, if it has not already been added. SSH agent management of the key is required for password-less SSH authentication onto your cluster nodes, or if you want to use the ./openshift-install gather command.

    On some distributions, default SSH private key identities such as ~/.ssh/id_rsa and ~/.ssh/id_dsa are managed automatically.

    1. If the ssh-agent process is not already running for your local user, start it as a background task:

      $ eval "$(ssh-agent -s)"
      Example output
      Agent pid 31874

      If your cluster is in FIPS mode, only use FIPS-compliant algorithms to generate the SSH key. The key must be either RSA or ECDSA.

  4. Add your SSH private key to the ssh-agent:

    $ ssh-add <path>/<file_name> (1)
    1 Specify the path and file name for your SSH private key, such as ~/.ssh/id_rsa
    Example output
    Identity added: /home/<you>/<path>/<file_name> (<computer_name>)
Next steps
  • When you install OKD, provide the SSH public key to the installation program.

Creating the installation files for Azure Stack Hub

To install OKD on Microsoft Azure Stack Hub using user-provisioned infrastructure, you must generate the files that the installation program needs to deploy your cluster and modify them so that the cluster creates only the machines that it will use. You manually create the install-config.yaml file, and then generate and customize the Kubernetes manifests and Ignition config files. You also have the option to first set up a separate var partition during the preparation phases of installation.

Manually creating the installation configuration file

Prerequisites
  • You have an SSH public key on your local machine to provide to the installation program. The key will be used for SSH authentication onto your cluster nodes for debugging and disaster recovery.

  • You have obtained the OKD installation program and the pull secret for your cluster.

Procedure
  1. Create an installation directory to store your required installation assets in:

    $ mkdir <installation_directory>

    You must create a directory. Some installation assets, like bootstrap X.509 certificates have short expiration intervals, so you must not reuse an installation directory. If you want to reuse individual files from another cluster installation, you can copy them into your directory. However, the file names for the installation assets might change between releases. Use caution when copying installation files from an earlier OKD version.

  2. Customize the sample install-config.yaml file template that is provided and save it in the <installation_directory>.

    You must name this configuration file install-config.yaml.

    Make the following modifications for Azure Stack Hub:

    1. Set the replicas parameter to 0 for the compute pool:

      compute:
      - hyperthreading: Enabled
        name: worker
        platform: {}
        replicas: 0 (1)
      1 Set to 0.

      The compute machines will be provisioned manually later.

    2. Update the platform.azure section of the install-config.yaml file to configure your Azure Stack Hub configuration:

      platform:
        azure:
          armEndpoint: <azurestack_arm_endpoint> (1)
          baseDomainResourceGroupName: <resource_group> (2)
          cloudName: AzureStackCloud (3)
          region: <azurestack_region> (4)
      1 Specify the Azure Resource Manager endpoint of your Azure Stack Hub environment, like https://adminmanagement.local.azurestack.external.
      2 Specify the name of the resource group that contains the DNS zone for your base domain.
      3 Specify the Azure Stack Hub environment, which is used to configure the Azure SDK with the appropriate Azure API endpoints.
      4 Specify the name of your Azure Stack Hub region.
  3. Back up the install-config.yaml file so that you can use it to install multiple clusters.

    The install-config.yaml file is consumed during the next step of the installation process. You must back it up now.

Sample customized install-config.yaml file for Azure Stack Hub

You can customize the install-config.yaml file to specify more details about your OKD cluster’s platform or modify the values of the required parameters.

This sample YAML file is provided for reference only. Use it as a resource to enter parameter values into the installation configuration file that you created manually.

apiVersion: v1
baseDomain: example.com
controlPlane: (1)
  name: master
  replicas: 3
compute: (1)
- name: worker
  platform: {}
  replicas: 0
metadata:
  name: test-cluster (2)
networking:
  clusterNetwork:
  - cidr: 10.128.0.0/14
    hostPrefix: 23
  machineNetwork:
  - cidr: 10.0.0.0/16
  networkType: OVNKubernetes
  serviceNetwork:
  - 172.30.0.0/16
platform:
  azure:
    armEndpoint: azurestack_arm_endpoint (3)
    baseDomainResourceGroupName: resource_group (4)
    region: azure_stack_local_region (5)
    resourceGroupName: existing_resource_group (6)
    outboundType: Loadbalancer
    cloudName: AzureStackCloud (7)
pullSecret: '{"auths": ...}' (8)
sshKey: ssh-ed25519 AAAA... (9)
1 The controlPlane section is a single mapping, but the compute section is a sequence of mappings. To meet the requirements of the different data structures, the first line of the compute section must begin with a hyphen, -, and the first line of the controlPlane section must not. Although both sections currently define a single machine pool, it is possible that future versions of OKD will support defining multiple compute pools during installation. Only one control plane pool is used.
2 Specify the name of the cluster.
3 Specify the Azure Resource Manager endpoint that your Azure Stack Hub operator provides.
4 Specify the name of the resource group that contains the DNS zone for your base domain.
5 Specify the name of your Azure Stack Hub local region.
6 Specify the name of an already existing resource group to install your cluster to. If undefined, a new resource group is created for the cluster.
7 Specify the Azure Stack Hub environment as your target platform.
8 Specify the pull secret required to authenticate your cluster.
9 You can optionally provide the sshKey value that you use to access the machines in your cluster.

For production OKD clusters on which you want to perform installation debugging or disaster recovery, specify an SSH key that your ssh-agent process uses.

Configuring the cluster-wide proxy during installation

Production environments can deny direct access to the internet and instead have an HTTP or HTTPS proxy available. You can configure a new OKD cluster to use a proxy by configuring the proxy settings in the install-config.yaml file.

Prerequisites
  • You have an existing install-config.yaml file.

  • You reviewed the sites that your cluster requires access to and determined whether any of them need to bypass the proxy. By default, all cluster egress traffic is proxied, including calls to hosting cloud provider APIs. You added sites to the Proxy object’s spec.noProxy field to bypass the proxy if necessary.

    The Proxy object status.noProxy field is populated with the values of the networking.machineNetwork[].cidr, networking.clusterNetwork[].cidr, and networking.serviceNetwork[] fields from your installation configuration.

    For installations on Amazon Web Services (AWS), Google Cloud Platform (GCP), Microsoft Azure, and Red Hat OpenStack Platform (RHOSP), the Proxy object status.noProxy field is also populated with the instance metadata endpoint (169.254.169.254).

  • If your cluster is on AWS, you added the ec2.<region>.amazonaws.com, elasticloadbalancing.<region>.amazonaws.com, and s3.<region>.amazonaws.com endpoints to your VPC endpoint. These endpoints are required to complete requests from the nodes to the AWS EC2 API. Because the proxy works on the container level, not the node level, you must route these requests to the AWS EC2 API through the AWS private network. Adding the public IP address of the EC2 API to your allowlist in your proxy server is not sufficient.

Procedure
  1. Edit your install-config.yaml file and add the proxy settings. For example:

    apiVersion: v1
    baseDomain: my.domain.com
    proxy:
      httpProxy: http://<username>:<pswd>@<ip>:<port> (1)
      httpsProxy: https://<username>:<pswd>@<ip>:<port> (2)
      noProxy: example.com (3)
    additionalTrustBundle: | (4)
        -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
        <MY_TRUSTED_CA_CERT>
        -----END CERTIFICATE-----
    ...
    1 A proxy URL to use for creating HTTP connections outside the cluster. The URL scheme must be http. If you use an MITM transparent proxy network that does not require additional proxy configuration but requires additional CAs, you must not specify an httpProxy value.
    2 A proxy URL to use for creating HTTPS connections outside the cluster. If you use an MITM transparent proxy network that does not require additional proxy configuration but requires additional CAs, you must not specify an httpsProxy value.
    3 A comma-separated list of destination domain names, IP addresses, or other network CIDRs to exclude from proxying. Preface a domain with . to match subdomains only. For example, .y.com matches x.y.com, but not y.com. Use * to bypass the proxy for all destinations.
    4 If provided, the installation program generates a config map that is named user-ca-bundle in the openshift-config namespace that contains one or more additional CA certificates that are required for proxying HTTPS connections. The Cluster Network Operator then creates a trusted-ca-bundle config map that merges these contents with the Fedora CoreOS (FCOS) trust bundle, and this config map is referenced in the trustedCA field of the Proxy object. The additionalTrustBundle field is required unless the proxy’s identity certificate is signed by an authority from the FCOS trust bundle. If you use an MITM transparent proxy network that does not require additional proxy configuration but requires additional CAs, you must provide the MITM CA certificate.

    The installation program does not support the proxy readinessEndpoints field.

  2. Save the file and reference it when installing OKD.

The installation program creates a cluster-wide proxy that is named cluster that uses the proxy settings in the provided install-config.yaml file. If no proxy settings are provided, a cluster Proxy object is still created, but it will have a nil spec.

Only the Proxy object named cluster is supported, and no additional proxies can be created.

Exporting common variables for ARM templates

You must export a common set of variables that are used with the provided Azure Resource Manager (ARM) templates used to assist in completing a user-provided infrastructure install on Microsoft Azure Stack Hub.

Specific ARM templates can also require additional exported variables, which are detailed in their related procedures.

Prerequisites
  • Obtain the OKD installation program and the pull secret for your cluster.

Procedure
  1. Export common variables found in the install-config.yaml to be used by the provided ARM templates:

    $ export CLUSTER_NAME=<cluster_name>(1)
    $ export AZURE_REGION=<azure_region>(2)
    $ export SSH_KEY=<ssh_key>(3)
    $ export BASE_DOMAIN=<base_domain>(4)
    $ export BASE_DOMAIN_RESOURCE_GROUP=<base_domain_resource_group>(5)
    1 The value of the .metadata.name attribute from the install-config.yaml file.
    2 The region to deploy the cluster into. This is the value of the .platform.azure.region attribute from the install-config.yaml file.
    3 The SSH RSA public key file as a string. You must enclose the SSH key in quotes since it contains spaces. This is the value of the .sshKey attribute from the install-config.yaml file.
    4 The base domain to deploy the cluster to. The base domain corresponds to the DNS zone that you created for your cluster. This is the value of the .baseDomain attribute from the install-config.yaml file.
    5 The resource group where the DNS zone exists. This is the value of the .platform.azure.baseDomainResourceGroupName attribute from the install-config.yaml file.

    For example:

    $ export CLUSTER_NAME=test-cluster
    $ export AZURE_REGION=centralus
    $ export SSH_KEY="ssh-rsa xxx/xxx/xxx= user@email.com"
    $ export BASE_DOMAIN=example.com
    $ export BASE_DOMAIN_RESOURCE_GROUP=ocp-cluster
  2. Export the kubeadmin credentials:

    $ export KUBECONFIG=<installation_directory>/auth/kubeconfig (1)
    1 For <installation_directory>, specify the path to the directory that you stored the installation files in.

Creating the Kubernetes manifest and Ignition config files

Because you must modify some cluster definition files and manually start the cluster machines, you must generate the Kubernetes manifest and Ignition config files that the cluster needs to configure the machines.

The installation configuration file transforms into the Kubernetes manifests. The manifests wrap into the Ignition configuration files, which are later used to configure the cluster machines.

The Ignition config files that the OKD installation program generates contain certificates that expire after 24 hours, which are then renewed at that time. If the cluster is shut down before renewing the certificates and the cluster is later restarted after the 24 hours have elapsed, the cluster automatically recovers the expired certificates. The exception is that you must manually approve the pending node-bootstrapper certificate signing requests (CSRs) to recover kubelet certificates. See the documentation for Recovering from expired control plane certificates for more information.

Prerequisites
  • You obtained the OKD installation program.

  • You created the install-config.yaml installation configuration file.

Procedure
  1. Change to the directory that contains the OKD installation program and generate the Kubernetes manifests for the cluster:

    $ ./openshift-install create manifests --dir=<installation_directory> (1)
    Example output
    INFO Credentials loaded from the "myprofile" profile in file "/home/myuser/.aws/credentials"
    INFO Consuming Install Config from target directory
    INFO Manifests created in: install_dir/manifests and install_dir/openshift
    1 For <installation_directory>, specify the installation directory that contains the install-config.yaml file you created.
  2. Remove the Kubernetes manifest files that define the control plane machines:

    $ rm -f <installation_directory>/openshift/99_openshift-cluster-api_master-machines-*.yaml

    By removing these files, you prevent the cluster from automatically generating control plane machines.

  3. Remove the Kubernetes manifest files that define the worker machines:

    $ rm -f <installation_directory>/openshift/99_openshift-cluster-api_worker-machineset-*.yaml

    Because you create and manage the worker machines yourself, you do not need to initialize these machines.

  4. Check that the mastersSchedulable parameter in the <installation_directory>/manifests/cluster-scheduler-02-config.yml Kubernetes manifest file is set to false. This setting prevents pods from being scheduled on the control plane machines:

    1. Open the <installation_directory>/manifests/cluster-scheduler-02-config.yml file.

    2. Locate the mastersSchedulable parameter and ensure that it is set to false.

    3. Save and exit the file.

  5. Optional: If you do not want the Ingress Operator to create DNS records on your behalf, remove the privateZone and publicZone sections from the <installation_directory>/manifests/cluster-dns-02-config.yml DNS configuration file:

    apiVersion: config.openshift.io/v1
    kind: DNS
    metadata:
      creationTimestamp: null
      name: cluster
    spec:
      baseDomain: example.openshift.com
      privateZone: (1)
        id: mycluster-100419-private-zone
      publicZone: (1)
        id: example.openshift.com
    status: {}
    1 Remove this section completely.

    If you do so, you must add ingress DNS records manually in a later step.

  6. When configuring Azure on user-provisioned infrastructure, you must export some common variables defined in the manifest files to use later in the Azure Resource Manager (ARM) templates:

    1. Export the infrastructure ID by using the following command:

      $ export INFRA_ID=<infra_id> (1)
      1 The OKD cluster has been assigned an identifier (INFRA_ID) in the form of <cluster_name>-<random_string>. This will be used as the base name for most resources created using the provided ARM templates. This is the value of the .status.infrastructureName attribute from the manifests/cluster-infrastructure-02-config.yml file.
    2. Export the resource group by using the following command:

      $ export RESOURCE_GROUP=<resource_group> (1)
      1 All resources created in this Azure deployment exists as part of a resource group. The resource group name is also based on the INFRA_ID, in the form of <cluster_name>-<random_string>-rg. This is the value of the .status.platformStatus.azure.resourceGroupName attribute from the manifests/cluster-infrastructure-02-config.yml file.
  7. Manually create your cloud credentials.

    1. From the directory that contains the installation program, obtain details of the OKD release image that your openshift-install binary is built to use:

      $ openshift-install version
      Example output
      release image quay.io/openshift-release-dev/ocp-release:4.y.z-x86_64
    2. Locate all CredentialsRequest objects in this release image that target the cloud you are deploying on:

      $ oc adm release extract quay.io/openshift-release-dev/ocp-release:4.y.z-x86_64 --credentials-requests --cloud=azure

      This command creates a YAML file for each CredentialsRequest object.

      Sample CredentialsRequest object
      apiVersion: cloudcredential.openshift.io/v1
      kind: CredentialsRequest
      metadata:
        labels:
          controller-tools.k8s.io: "1.0"
        name: openshift-image-registry-azure
        namespace: openshift-cloud-credential-operator
      spec:
        secretRef:
          name: installer-cloud-credentials
          namespace: openshift-image-registry
        providerSpec:
          apiVersion: cloudcredential.openshift.io/v1
          kind: AzureProviderSpec
          roleBindings:
          - role: Contributor
    3. Create YAML files for secrets in the openshift-install manifests directory that you generated previously. The secrets must be stored using the namespace and secret name defined in the spec.secretRef for each CredentialsRequest object. The format for the secret data varies for each cloud provider.

    4. Create a cco-configmap.yaml file in the manifests directory with the Cloud Config Operator (CCO) disabled:

      Sample ConfigMap object
      apiVersion: v1
      kind: ConfigMap
      metadata:
      name: cloud-credential-operator-config
      namespace: openshift-cloud-credential-operator
        annotations:
          release.openshift.io/create-only: "true"
      data:
        disabled: "true"
  8. To create the Ignition configuration files, run the following command from the directory that contains the installation program:

    $ ./openshift-install create ignition-configs --dir=<installation_directory> (1)
    1 For <installation_directory>, specify the same installation directory.

    Ignition config files are created for the bootstrap, control plane, and compute nodes in the installation directory. The kubeadmin-password and kubeconfig files are created in the ./<installation_directory>/auth directory:

    .
    ├── auth
    │   ├── kubeadmin-password
    │   └── kubeconfig
    ├── bootstrap.ign
    ├── master.ign
    ├── metadata.json
    └── worker.ign

Optional: Creating a separate /var partition

It is recommended that disk partitioning for OKD be left to the installer. However, there are cases where you might want to create separate partitions in a part of the filesystem that you expect to grow.

OKD supports the addition of a single partition to attach storage to either the /var partition or a subdirectory of /var. For example:

  • /var/lib/containers: Holds container-related content that can grow as more images and containers are added to a system.

  • /var/lib/etcd: Holds data that you might want to keep separate for purposes such as performance optimization of etcd storage.

  • /var: Holds data that you might want to keep separate for purposes such as auditing.

Storing the contents of a /var directory separately makes it easier to grow storage for those areas as needed and reinstall OKD at a later date and keep that data intact. With this method, you will not have to pull all your containers again, nor will you have to copy massive log files when you update systems.

Because /var must be in place before a fresh installation of Fedora CoreOS (FCOS), the following procedure sets up the separate /var partition by creating a machine config manifest that is inserted during the openshift-install preparation phases of an OKD installation.

If you follow the steps to create a separate /var partition in this procedure, it is not necessary to create the Kubernetes manifest and Ignition config files again as described later in this section.

Procedure
  1. Create a directory to hold the OKD installation files:

    $ mkdir $HOME/clusterconfig
  2. Run openshift-install to create a set of files in the manifest and openshift subdirectories. Answer the system questions as you are prompted:

    $ openshift-install create manifests --dir $HOME/clusterconfig
    Example output
    ? SSH Public Key ...
    INFO Credentials loaded from the "myprofile" profile in file "/home/myuser/.aws/credentials"
    INFO Consuming Install Config from target directory
    INFO Manifests created in: $HOME/clusterconfig/manifests and $HOME/clusterconfig/openshift
  3. Optional: Confirm that the installation program created manifests in the clusterconfig/openshift directory:

    $ ls $HOME/clusterconfig/openshift/
    Example output
    99_kubeadmin-password-secret.yaml
    99_openshift-cluster-api_master-machines-0.yaml
    99_openshift-cluster-api_master-machines-1.yaml
    99_openshift-cluster-api_master-machines-2.yaml
    ...
  4. Create a Butane config that configures the additional partition. For example, name the file $HOME/clusterconfig/98-var-partition.bu, change the disk device name to the name of the storage device on the worker systems, and set the storage size as appropriate. This example places the /var directory on a separate partition:

    variant: openshift
    version: 4.9.0
    metadata:
      labels:
        machineconfiguration.openshift.io/role: worker
      name: 98-var-partition
    storage:
      disks:
      - device: /dev/<device_name> (1)
        partitions:
        - label: var
          start_mib: <partition_start_offset> (2)
          size_mib: <partition_size> (3)
      filesystems:
        - device: /dev/disk/by-partlabel/var
          path: /var
          format: xfs
          mount_options: [defaults, prjquota] (4)
          with_mount_unit: true
    1 The storage device name of the disk that you want to partition.
    2 When adding a data partition to the boot disk, a minimum value of 25000 MiB (Mebibytes) is recommended. The root file system is automatically resized to fill all available space up to the specified offset. If no value is specified, or if the specified value is smaller than the recommended minimum, the resulting root file system will be too small, and future reinstalls of FCOS might overwrite the beginning of the data partition.
    3 The size of the data partition in mebibytes.
    4 The prjquota mount option must be enabled for filesystems used for container storage.

    When creating a separate /var partition, you cannot use different instance types for worker nodes, if the different instance types do not have the same device name.

  5. Create a manifest from the Butane config and save it to the clusterconfig/openshift directory. For example, run the following command:

    $ butane $HOME/clusterconfig/98-var-partition.bu -o $HOME/clusterconfig/openshift/98-var-partition.yaml
  6. Run openshift-install again to create Ignition configs from a set of files in the manifest and openshift subdirectories:

    $ openshift-install create ignition-configs --dir $HOME/clusterconfig
    $ ls $HOME/clusterconfig/
    auth  bootstrap.ign  master.ign  metadata.json  worker.ign

Now you can use the Ignition config files as input to the installation procedures to install Fedora CoreOS (FCOS) systems.

Creating the Azure resource group

You must create a Microsoft Azure resource group. This is used during the installation of your OKD cluster on Azure Stack Hub.

Prerequisites
  • Configure an Azure account.

  • Generate the Ignition config files for your cluster.

Procedure
  • Create the resource group in a supported Azure region:

    $ az group create --name ${RESOURCE_GROUP} --location ${AZURE_REGION}

Uploading the FCOS cluster image and bootstrap Ignition config file

The Azure client does not support deployments based on files existing locally; therefore, you must copy and store the FCOS virtual hard disk (VHD) cluster image and bootstrap Ignition config file in a storage container so they are accessible during deployment.

Prerequisites
  • Configure an Azure account.

  • Generate the Ignition config files for your cluster.

Procedure
  1. Create an Azure storage account to store the VHD cluster image:

    $ az storage account create -g ${RESOURCE_GROUP} --location ${AZURE_REGION} --name ${CLUSTER_NAME}sa --kind Storage --sku Standard_LRS

    The Azure storage account name must be between 3 and 24 characters in length and use numbers and lower-case letters only. If your CLUSTER_NAME variable does not follow these restrictions, you must manually define the Azure storage account name. For more information on Azure storage account name restrictions, see Resolve errors for storage account names in the Azure documentation.

  2. Export the storage account key as an environment variable:

    $ export ACCOUNT_KEY=`az storage account keys list -g ${RESOURCE_GROUP} --account-name ${CLUSTER_NAME}sa --query "[0].value" -o tsv`
  3. Choose the FCOS version to use and export the URL of its VHD to an environment variable:

    $ export COMPRESSED_VHD_URL=`curl -s https://raw.githubusercontent.com/openshift/installer/release-4.9/data/data/rhcos-amd64.json | jq -r '(.baseURI + .images.azurestack.path)'`

    The FCOS images might not change with every release of OKD. You must specify an image with the highest version that is less than or equal to the OKD version that you install. Use the image version that matches your OKD version if it is available.

  4. Create the storage container for the VHD:

    $ az storage container create --name vhd --account-name ${CLUSTER_NAME}sa --account-key ${ACCOUNT_KEY}
  5. Download the compressed FCOS VHD file locally:

    $ curl -O -L ${COMPRESSED_VHD_URL}
  6. Decompress the VHD file.

    The decompressed VHD file is approximately 16 GB, so be sure that your host system has 16 GB of free space available. The VHD file can be deleted once you have uploaded it.

  7. Copy the chosen VHD to a blob:

    $ az storage blob upload --account-name ${CLUSTER_NAME}sa --account-key ${ACCOUNT_KEY} -c vhd -n "rhcos.vhd" -f rhcos-<rhcos_version>-azurestack.x86_64.vhd
  8. Create a blob storage container and upload the generated bootstrap.ign file:

    $ az storage container create --name files --account-name ${CLUSTER_NAME}sa --account-key ${ACCOUNT_KEY} --public-access blob
    $ az storage blob upload --account-name ${CLUSTER_NAME}sa --account-key ${ACCOUNT_KEY} -c "files" -f "<installation_directory>/bootstrap.ign" -n "bootstrap.ign"

Example for creating DNS zones

DNS records are required for clusters that use user-provisioned infrastructure. You should choose the DNS strategy that fits your scenario.

For this example, Azure Stack Hub’s datacenter DNS integration is used, so you will create a DNS zone.

The DNS zone is not required to exist in the same resource group as the cluster deployment and might already exist in your organization for the desired base domain. If that is the case, you can skip creating the DNS zone; be sure the installation config you generated earlier reflects that scenario.

Prerequisites
  • Configure an Azure account.

  • Generate the Ignition config files for your cluster.

Procedure
  • Create the new DNS zone in the resource group exported in the BASE_DOMAIN_RESOURCE_GROUP environment variable:

    $ az network dns zone create -g ${BASE_DOMAIN_RESOURCE_GROUP} -n ${CLUSTER_NAME}.${BASE_DOMAIN}

    You can skip this step if you are using a DNS zone that already exists.

You can learn more about configuring a DNS zone in Azure Stack Hub by visiting that section.

Creating a VNet in Azure Stack Hub

You must create a virtual network (VNet) in Microsoft Azure Stack Hub for your OKD cluster to use. You can customize the VNet to meet your requirements. One way to create the VNet is to modify the provided Azure Resource Manager (ARM) template.

If you do not use the provided ARM template to create your Azure Stack Hub infrastructure, you must review the provided information and manually create the infrastructure. If your cluster does not initialize correctly, you might have to contact Red Hat support with your installation logs.

Prerequisites
  • Configure an Azure account.

  • Generate the Ignition config files for your cluster.

Procedure
  1. Copy the template from the ARM template for the VNet section of this topic and save it as 01_vnet.json in your cluster’s installation directory. This template describes the VNet that your cluster requires.

  2. Create the deployment by using the az CLI:

    $ az deployment group create -g ${RESOURCE_GROUP} \
      --template-file "<installation_directory>/01_vnet.json" \
      --parameters baseName="${INFRA_ID}"(1)
    1 The base name to be used in resource names; this is usually the cluster’s infrastructure ID.

ARM template for the VNet

You can use the following Azure Resource Manager (ARM) template to deploy the VNet that you need for your OKD cluster:

01_vnet.json ARM template
{
  "$schema" : "https://schema.management.azure.com/schemas/2015-01-01/deploymentTemplate.json#",
  "contentVersion" : "1.0.0.0",
  "parameters" : {
    "baseName" : {
      "type" : "string",
      "minLength" : 1,
      "metadata" : {
        "description" : "Base name to be used in resource names (usually the cluster's Infra ID)"
      }
    }
  },
  "variables" : {
    "location" : "[resourceGroup().location]",
    "virtualNetworkName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), '-vnet')]",
    "addressPrefix" : "10.0.0.0/16",
    "masterSubnetName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), '-master-subnet')]",
    "masterSubnetPrefix" : "10.0.0.0/24",
    "nodeSubnetName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), '-worker-subnet')]",
    "nodeSubnetPrefix" : "10.0.1.0/24",
    "clusterNsgName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), '-nsg')]"
  },
  "resources" : [
    {
      "apiVersion" : "2017-10-01",
      "type" : "Microsoft.Network/virtualNetworks",
      "name" : "[variables('virtualNetworkName')]",
      "location" : "[variables('location')]",
      "dependsOn" : [
        "[concat('Microsoft.Network/networkSecurityGroups/', variables('clusterNsgName'))]"
      ],
      "properties" : {
        "addressSpace" : {
          "addressPrefixes" : [
            "[variables('addressPrefix')]"
          ]
        },
        "subnets" : [
          {
            "name" : "[variables('masterSubnetName')]",
            "properties" : {
              "addressPrefix" : "[variables('masterSubnetPrefix')]",
              "serviceEndpoints": [],
              "networkSecurityGroup" : {
                "id" : "[resourceId('Microsoft.Network/networkSecurityGroups', variables('clusterNsgName'))]"
              }
            }
          },
          {
            "name" : "[variables('nodeSubnetName')]",
            "properties" : {
              "addressPrefix" : "[variables('nodeSubnetPrefix')]",
              "serviceEndpoints": [],
              "networkSecurityGroup" : {
                "id" : "[resourceId('Microsoft.Network/networkSecurityGroups', variables('clusterNsgName'))]"
              }
            }
          }
        ]
      }
    },
    {
      "type" : "Microsoft.Network/networkSecurityGroups",
      "name" : "[variables('clusterNsgName')]",
      "apiVersion" : "2017-10-01",
      "location" : "[variables('location')]",
      "properties" : {
        "securityRules" : [
          {
            "name" : "apiserver_in",
            "properties" : {
              "protocol" : "Tcp",
              "sourcePortRange" : "*",
              "destinationPortRange" : "6443",
              "sourceAddressPrefix" : "*",
              "destinationAddressPrefix" : "*",
              "access" : "Allow",
              "priority" : 101,
              "direction" : "Inbound"
            }
          },
          {
            "name" : "ign_in",
            "properties" : {
              "protocol" : "*",
              "sourcePortRange" : "*",
              "destinationPortRange" : "22623",
              "sourceAddressPrefix" : "*",
              "destinationAddressPrefix" : "*",
              "access" : "Allow",
              "priority" : 102,
              "direction" : "Inbound"
            }
          }
        ]
      }
    }
  ]
}

Deploying the FCOS cluster image for the Azure Stack Hub infrastructure

You must use a valid Fedora CoreOS (FCOS) image for Microsoft Azure Stack Hub for your OKD nodes.

Prerequisites
  • Configure an Azure account.

  • Generate the Ignition config files for your cluster.

  • Store the FCOS virtual hard disk (VHD) cluster image in an Azure storage container.

  • Store the bootstrap Ignition config file in an Azure storage container.

Procedure
  1. Copy the template from the ARM template for image storage section of this topic and save it as 02_storage.json in your cluster’s installation directory. This template describes the image storage that your cluster requires.

  2. Export the FCOS VHD blob URL as a variable:

    $ export VHD_BLOB_URL=`az storage blob url --account-name ${CLUSTER_NAME}sa --account-key ${ACCOUNT_KEY} -c vhd -n "rhcos.vhd" -o tsv`
  3. Deploy the cluster image:

    $ az deployment group create -g ${RESOURCE_GROUP} \
      --template-file "<installation_directory>/02_storage.json" \
      --parameters vhdBlobURL="${VHD_BLOB_URL}" \ (1)
      --parameters baseName="${INFRA_ID}"(2)
    
    1 The blob URL of the FCOS VHD to be used to create master and worker machines.
    2 The base name to be used in resource names; this is usually the cluster’s infrastructure ID.

ARM template for image storage

You can use the following Azure Resource Manager (ARM) template to deploy the stored Fedora CoreOS (FCOS) image that you need for your OKD cluster:

02_storage.json ARM template
{
  "$schema" : "https://schema.management.azure.com/schemas/2015-01-01/deploymentTemplate.json#",
  "contentVersion" : "1.0.0.0",
  "parameters" : {
    "baseName" : {
      "type" : "string",
      "minLength" : 1,
      "metadata" : {
        "description" : "Base name to be used in resource names (usually the cluster's Infra ID)"
      }
    },
    "vhdBlobURL" : {
      "type" : "string",
      "metadata" : {
        "description" : "URL pointing to the blob where the VHD to be used to create master and worker machines is located"
      }
    }
  },
  "variables" : {
    "location" : "[resourceGroup().location]",
    "imageName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), '-image')]"
  },
  "resources" : [
    {
      "apiVersion" : "2017-12-01",
      "type": "Microsoft.Compute/images",
      "name": "[variables('imageName')]",
      "location" : "[variables('location')]",
      "properties": {
        "storageProfile": {
          "osDisk": {
            "osType": "Linux",
            "osState": "Generalized",
            "blobUri": "[parameters('vhdBlobURL')]",
            "storageAccountType": "Standard_LRS"
          }
        }
      }
    }
  ]
}

Networking requirements for user-provisioned infrastructure

All the Fedora CoreOS (FCOS) machines require networking to be configured in initramfs during boot to fetch their Ignition config files.

Network connectivity requirements

You must configure the network connectivity between machines to allow OKD cluster components to communicate. Each machine must be able to resolve the hostnames of all other machines in the cluster.

This section provides details about the ports that are required.

In connected OKD environments, all nodes are required to have internet access to pull images for platform containers and provide telemetry data to Red Hat.

Table 1. Ports used for all-machine to all-machine communications
Protocol Port Description

ICMP

N/A

Network reachability tests

TCP

1936

Metrics

9000-9999

Host level services, including the node exporter on ports 9100-9101 and the Cluster Version Operator on port 9099.

10250-10259

The default ports that Kubernetes reserves

10256

openshift-sdn

UDP

4789

VXLAN and Geneve

6081

VXLAN and Geneve

9000-9999

Host level services, including the node exporter on ports 9100-9101.

TCP/UDP

30000-32767

Kubernetes node port

Table 2. Ports used for all-machine to control plane communications
Protocol Port Description

TCP

6443

Kubernetes API

Table 3. Ports used for control plane machine to control plane machine communications
Protocol Port Description

TCP

2379-2380

etcd server and peer ports

Creating networking and load balancing components in Azure Stack Hub

You must configure networking and load balancing in Microsoft Azure Stack Hub for your OKD cluster to use. One way to create these components is to modify the provided Azure Resource Manager (ARM) template.

Load balancing requires the following DNS records:

  • An api DNS record for the API public load balancer in the DNS zone.

  • An api-int DNS record for the API internal load balancer in the DNS zone.

If you do not use the provided ARM template to create your Azure Stack Hub infrastructure, you must review the provided information and manually create the infrastructure. If your cluster does not initialize correctly, you might have to contact Red Hat support with your installation logs.

Prerequisites
  • Configure an Azure account.

  • Generate the Ignition config files for your cluster.

  • Create and configure a VNet and associated subnets in Azure Stack Hub.

Procedure
  1. Copy the template from the ARM template for the network and load balancers section of this topic and save it as 03_infra.json in your cluster’s installation directory. This template describes the networking and load balancing objects that your cluster requires.

  2. Create the deployment by using the az CLI:

    $ az deployment group create -g ${RESOURCE_GROUP} \
      --template-file "<installation_directory>/03_infra.json" \
      --parameters baseName="${INFRA_ID}"(1)
    1 The base name to be used in resource names; this is usually the cluster’s infrastructure ID.
  3. Create an api DNS record and an api-int DNS record. When creating the API DNS records, the ${BASE_DOMAIN_RESOURCE_GROUP} variable must point to the resource group where the DNS zone exists.

    1. Export the following variable:

      $ export PUBLIC_IP=`az network public-ip list -g ${RESOURCE_GROUP} --query "[?name=='${INFRA_ID}-master-pip'] | [0].ipAddress" -o tsv`
    2. Export the following variable:

      $ export PRIVATE_IP=`az network lb frontend-ip show -g "$RESOURCE_GROUP" --lb-name "${INFRA_ID}-internal" -n internal-lb-ip --query "privateIpAddress" -o tsv`
    3. Create the api DNS record in a new DNS zone:

      $ az network dns record-set a add-record -g ${BASE_DOMAIN_RESOURCE_GROUP} -z ${CLUSTER_NAME}.${BASE_DOMAIN} -n api -a ${PUBLIC_IP} --ttl 60

      If you are adding the cluster to an existing DNS zone, you can create the api DNS record in it instead:

      $ az network dns record-set a add-record -g ${BASE_DOMAIN_RESOURCE_GROUP} -z ${BASE_DOMAIN} -n api.${CLUSTER_NAME} -a ${PUBLIC_IP} --ttl 60
    4. Create the api-int DNS record in a new DNS zone:

      $ az network dns record-set a add-record -g ${BASE_DOMAIN_RESOURCE_GROUP} -z "${CLUSTER_NAME}.${BASE_DOMAIN}" -n api-int -a ${PRIVATE_IP} --ttl 60

      If you are adding the cluster to an existing DNS zone, you can create the api-int DNS record in it instead:

      $ az network dns record-set a add-record -g ${BASE_DOMAIN_RESOURCE_GROUP} -z ${BASE_DOMAIN} -n api-int.${CLUSTER_NAME} -a ${PRIVATE_IP} --ttl 60

ARM template for the network and load balancers

You can use the following Azure Resource Manager (ARM) template to deploy the networking objects and load balancers that you need for your OKD cluster:

03_infra.json ARM template
{
  "$schema" : "https://schema.management.azure.com/schemas/2015-01-01/deploymentTemplate.json#",
  "contentVersion" : "1.0.0.0",
  "parameters" : {
    "baseName" : {
      "type" : "string",
      "minLength" : 1,
      "metadata" : {
        "description" : "Base name to be used in resource names (usually the cluster's Infra ID)"
      }
    }
  },
  "variables" : {
    "location" : "[resourceGroup().location]",
    "virtualNetworkName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), '-vnet')]",
    "virtualNetworkID" : "[resourceId('Microsoft.Network/virtualNetworks', variables('virtualNetworkName'))]",
    "masterSubnetName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), '-master-subnet')]",
    "masterSubnetRef" : "[concat(variables('virtualNetworkID'), '/subnets/', variables('masterSubnetName'))]",
    "masterPublicIpAddressName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), '-master-pip')]",
    "masterPublicIpAddressID" : "[resourceId('Microsoft.Network/publicIPAddresses', variables('masterPublicIpAddressName'))]",
    "masterLoadBalancerName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'))]",
    "masterLoadBalancerID" : "[resourceId('Microsoft.Network/loadBalancers', variables('masterLoadBalancerName'))]",
    "masterAvailabilitySetName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), '-avset')]",
    "internalLoadBalancerName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), '-internal')]",
    "internalLoadBalancerID" : "[resourceId('Microsoft.Network/loadBalancers', variables('internalLoadBalancerName'))]",
    "skuName": "Basic"
  },
  "resources" : [
    {
      "apiVersion": "2017-03-30",
      "type" : "Microsoft.Compute/availabilitySets",
      "name" : "[variables('masterAvailabilitySetName')]",
      "location" : "[variables('location')]",
      "properties": {
        "platformFaultDomainCount": "2",
        "platformUpdateDomainCount": "5"
      },
      "sku": {
        "name": "Aligned"
      }
    },
    {
      "apiVersion" : "2017-10-01",
      "type" : "Microsoft.Network/publicIPAddresses",
      "name" : "[variables('masterPublicIpAddressName')]",
      "location" : "[variables('location')]",
      "sku": {
        "name": "[variables('skuName')]"
      },
      "properties" : {
        "publicIPAllocationMethod" : "Static",
        "dnsSettings" : {
          "domainNameLabel" : "[variables('masterPublicIpAddressName')]"
        }
      }
    },
    {
      "apiVersion" : "2017-10-01",
      "type" : "Microsoft.Network/loadBalancers",
      "name" : "[variables('masterLoadBalancerName')]",
      "location" : "[variables('location')]",
      "sku": {
        "name": "[variables('skuName')]"
      },
      "dependsOn" : [
        "[concat('Microsoft.Network/publicIPAddresses/', variables('masterPublicIpAddressName'))]"
      ],
      "properties" : {
        "frontendIPConfigurations" : [
          {
            "name" : "public-lb-ip",
            "properties" : {
              "publicIPAddress" : {
                "id" : "[variables('masterPublicIpAddressID')]"
              }
            }
          }
        ],
        "backendAddressPools" : [
          {
            "name" : "[variables('masterLoadBalancerName')]"
          }
        ],
        "loadBalancingRules" : [
          {
            "name" : "api-public",
            "properties" : {
              "frontendIPConfiguration" : {
                "id" :"[concat(variables('masterLoadBalancerID'), '/frontendIPConfigurations/public-lb-ip')]"
              },
              "backendAddressPool" : {
                "id" : "[concat(variables('masterLoadBalancerID'), '/backendAddressPools/', variables('masterLoadBalancerName'))]"
              },
              "protocol" : "Tcp",
              "loadDistribution" : "Default",
              "idleTimeoutInMinutes" : 30,
              "frontendPort" : 6443,
              "backendPort" : 6443,
              "probe" : {
                "id" : "[concat(variables('masterLoadBalancerID'), '/probes/api-public-probe')]"
              }
            }
          }
        ],
        "probes" : [
          {
            "name" : "api-public-probe",
            "properties" : {
              "protocol" : "Tcp",
              "port" : 6443,
              "intervalInSeconds" : 10,
              "numberOfProbes" : 3
            }
          }
        ]
      }
    },
    {
      "apiVersion" : "2017-10-01",
      "type" : "Microsoft.Network/loadBalancers",
      "name" : "[variables('internalLoadBalancerName')]",
      "location" : "[variables('location')]",
      "sku": {
        "name": "[variables('skuName')]"
      },
      "properties" : {
        "frontendIPConfigurations" : [
          {
            "name" : "internal-lb-ip",
            "properties" : {
              "privateIPAllocationMethod" : "Dynamic",
              "subnet" : {
                "id" : "[variables('masterSubnetRef')]"
              },
              "privateIPAddressVersion" : "IPv4"
            }
          }
        ],
        "backendAddressPools" : [
          {
            "name" : "[variables('internalLoadBalancerName')]"
          }
        ],
        "loadBalancingRules" : [
          {
            "name" : "api-internal",
            "properties" : {
              "frontendIPConfiguration" : {
                "id" : "[concat(variables('internalLoadBalancerID'), '/frontendIPConfigurations/internal-lb-ip')]"
              },
              "frontendPort" : 6443,
              "backendPort" : 6443,
              "enableFloatingIP" : false,
              "idleTimeoutInMinutes" : 30,
              "protocol" : "Tcp",
              "enableTcpReset" : false,
              "loadDistribution" : "Default",
              "backendAddressPool" : {
                "id" : "[concat(variables('internalLoadBalancerID'), '/backendAddressPools/', variables('internalLoadBalancerName'))]"
              },
              "probe" : {
                "id" : "[concat(variables('internalLoadBalancerID'), '/probes/api-internal-probe')]"
              }
            }
          },
          {
            "name" : "sint",
            "properties" : {
              "frontendIPConfiguration" : {
                "id" : "[concat(variables('internalLoadBalancerID'), '/frontendIPConfigurations/internal-lb-ip')]"
              },
              "frontendPort" : 22623,
              "backendPort" : 22623,
              "enableFloatingIP" : false,
              "idleTimeoutInMinutes" : 30,
              "protocol" : "Tcp",
              "enableTcpReset" : false,
              "loadDistribution" : "Default",
              "backendAddressPool" : {
                "id" : "[concat(variables('internalLoadBalancerID'), '/backendAddressPools/', variables('internalLoadBalancerName'))]"
              },
              "probe" : {
                "id" : "[concat(variables('internalLoadBalancerID'), '/probes/sint-probe')]"
              }
            }
          }
        ],
        "probes" : [
          {
            "name" : "api-internal-probe",
            "properties" : {
              "protocol" : "Tcp",
              "port" : 6443,
              "intervalInSeconds" : 10,
              "numberOfProbes" : 3
            }
          },
          {
            "name" : "sint-probe",
            "properties" : {
              "protocol" : "Tcp",
              "port" : 22623,
              "intervalInSeconds" : 10,
              "numberOfProbes" : 3
            }
          }
        ]
      }
    }
  ]
}

Creating the bootstrap machine in Azure Stack Hub

You must create the bootstrap machine in Microsoft Azure Stack Hub to use during OKD cluster initialization. One way to create this machine is to modify the provided Azure Resource Manager (ARM) template.

If you do not use the provided ARM template to create your bootstrap machine, you must review the provided information and manually create the infrastructure. If your cluster does not initialize correctly, you might have to contact Red Hat support with your installation logs.

Prerequisites
  • Configure an Azure account.

  • Generate the Ignition config files for your cluster.

  • Create and configure a VNet and associated subnets in Azure Stack Hub.

  • Create and configure networking and load balancers in Azure Stack Hub.

  • Create control plane and compute roles.

Procedure
  1. Copy the template from the ARM template for the bootstrap machine section of this topic and save it as 04_bootstrap.json in your cluster’s installation directory. This template describes the bootstrap machine that your cluster requires.

  2. Export the following variables required by the bootstrap machine deployment:

    $ export BOOTSTRAP_URL=`az storage blob url --account-name ${CLUSTER_NAME}sa --account-key ${ACCOUNT_KEY} -c "files" -n "bootstrap.ign" -o tsv`
    $ export BOOTSTRAP_IGNITION=`jq -rcnM --arg v "3.2.0" --arg url ${BOOTSTRAP_URL} '{ignition:{version:$v,config:{replace:{source:$url}}}}' | base64 | tr -d '\n'`
  3. Create the deployment by using the az CLI:

    $ az deployment group create --verbose -g ${RESOURCE_GROUP} \
      --template-file "<installation_directory>/04_bootstrap.json" \
      --parameters bootstrapIgnition="${BOOTSTRAP_IGNITION}" \ (1)
      --parameters sshKeyData="${SSH_KEY}" \ (2)
      --parameters baseName="${INFRA_ID}" \ (3)
      --parameters diagnosticsStorageAccountName="${CLUSTER_NAME}sa" (4)
    
    1 The bootstrap Ignition content for the bootstrap cluster.
    2 The SSH RSA public key file as a string.
    3 The base name to be used in resource names; this is usually the cluster’s infrastructure ID.
    4 The name of the storage account for your cluster.

ARM template for the bootstrap machine

You can use the following Azure Resource Manager (ARM) template to deploy the bootstrap machine that you need for your OKD cluster:

04_bootstrap.json ARM template
{
  "$schema" : "https://schema.management.azure.com/schemas/2015-01-01/deploymentTemplate.json#",
  "contentVersion" : "1.0.0.0",
  "parameters" : {
    "baseName" : {
      "type" : "string",
      "minLength" : 1,
      "metadata" : {
        "description" : "Base name to be used in resource names (usually the cluster's Infra ID)"
      }
    },
    "bootstrapIgnition" : {
      "type" : "string",
      "minLength" : 1,
      "metadata" : {
        "description" : "Bootstrap ignition content for the bootstrap cluster"
      }
    },
    "sshKeyData" : {
      "type" : "securestring",
      "metadata" : {
        "description" : "SSH RSA public key file as a string."
      }
    },
    "diagnosticsStorageAccountName": {
      "type": "string"
    },
    "bootstrapVMSize" : {
      "type" : "string",
      "defaultValue" : "Standard_DS4_v2",
      "metadata" : {
        "description" : "The size of the Bootstrap Virtual Machine"
      }
    }
  },
  "variables" : {
    "location" : "[resourceGroup().location]",
    "virtualNetworkName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), '-vnet')]",
    "virtualNetworkID" : "[resourceId('Microsoft.Network/virtualNetworks', variables('virtualNetworkName'))]",
    "masterSubnetName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), '-master-subnet')]",
    "masterSubnetRef" : "[concat(variables('virtualNetworkID'), '/subnets/', variables('masterSubnetName'))]",
    "masterLoadBalancerName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'))]",
    "masterAvailabilitySetName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), '-avset')]",
    "internalLoadBalancerName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), '-internal')]",
    "sshKeyPath" : "/home/core/.ssh/authorized_keys",
    "vmName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), '-bootstrap')]",
    "nicName" : "[concat(variables('vmName'), '-nic')]",
    "imageName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), '-image')]",
    "clusterNsgName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), '-nsg')]",
    "sshPublicIpAddressName" : "[concat(variables('vmName'), '-ssh-pip')]"
  },
  "resources" : [
    {
      "apiVersion" : "2017-10-01",
      "type" : "Microsoft.Network/publicIPAddresses",
      "name" : "[variables('sshPublicIpAddressName')]",
      "location" : "[variables('location')]",
      "sku": {
        "name": "Basic"
      },
      "properties" : {
        "publicIPAllocationMethod" : "Static",
        "dnsSettings" : {
          "domainNameLabel" : "[variables('sshPublicIpAddressName')]"
        }
      }
    },
    {
      "apiVersion" : "2017-10-01",
      "type" : "Microsoft.Network/networkInterfaces",
      "name" : "[variables('nicName')]",
      "location" : "[variables('location')]",
      "dependsOn" : [
        "[resourceId('Microsoft.Network/publicIPAddresses', variables('sshPublicIpAddressName'))]"
      ],
      "properties" : {
        "securityRules": [
          {
            "properties": {
              "description": "ssh-in-nic",
              "protocol": "Tcp",
              "sourcePortRange": "*",
              "destinationPortRange": "22"
            }}],
        "ipConfigurations" : [
          {
            "name" : "pipConfig",
            "properties" : {
              "privateIPAllocationMethod" : "Dynamic",
              "publicIPAddress": {
                "id": "[resourceId('Microsoft.Network/publicIPAddresses', variables('sshPublicIpAddressName'))]"
              },
              "subnet" : {
                "id" : "[variables('masterSubnetRef')]"
              },
              "loadBalancerBackendAddressPools" : [
                {
                  "id" : "[concat('/subscriptions/', subscription().subscriptionId, '/resourceGroups/', resourceGroup().name, '/providers/Microsoft.Network/loadBalancers/', variables('masterLoadBalancerName'), '/backendAddressPools/', variables('masterLoadBalancerName'))]"
                },
                {
                  "id" : "[concat('/subscriptions/', subscription().subscriptionId, '/resourceGroups/', resourceGroup().name, '/providers/Microsoft.Network/loadBalancers/', variables('internalLoadBalancerName'), '/backendAddressPools/', variables('internalLoadBalancerName'))]"
                }
              ]
            }
          }
        ]
      }
    },
    {
      "name": "[parameters('diagnosticsStorageAccountName')]",
      "type": "Microsoft.Storage/storageAccounts",
      "apiVersion": "2017-10-01",
      "location": "[variables('location')]",
      "properties": {},
      "kind": "Storage",
      "sku": {
        "name": "Standard_LRS"
      }
    },
    {
      "apiVersion" : "2017-12-01",
      "type" : "Microsoft.Compute/virtualMachines",
      "name" : "[variables('vmName')]",
      "location" : "[variables('location')]",
      "dependsOn" : [
        "[concat('Microsoft.Network/networkInterfaces/', variables('nicName'))]",
        "[concat('Microsoft.Storage/storageAccounts/', parameters('diagnosticsStorageAccountName'))]"
      ],
      "properties" : {
        "availabilitySet": {
          "id": "[resourceId('Microsoft.Compute/availabilitySets',variables('masterAvailabilitySetName'))]"
        },
        "hardwareProfile" : {
          "vmSize" : "[parameters('bootstrapVMSize')]"
        },
        "osProfile" : {
          "computerName" : "[variables('vmName')]",
          "adminUsername" : "core",
          "customData" : "[parameters('bootstrapIgnition')]",
          "linuxConfiguration" : {
            "disablePasswordAuthentication" : true,
            "ssh" : {
              "publicKeys" : [
                {
                  "path" : "[variables('sshKeyPath')]",
                  "keyData" : "[parameters('sshKeyData')]"
                }
              ]
            }
          }
        },
        "storageProfile" : {
          "imageReference": {
            "id": "[resourceId('Microsoft.Compute/images', variables('imageName'))]"
          },
          "osDisk" : {
            "name": "[concat(variables('vmName'),'_OSDisk')]",
            "osType" : "Linux",
            "createOption" : "FromImage",
            "managedDisk": {
              "storageAccountType": "Standard_LRS"
            },
            "diskSizeGB" : 100
          }
        },
        "networkProfile" : {
          "networkInterfaces" : [
            {
              "id" : "[resourceId('Microsoft.Network/networkInterfaces', variables('nicName'))]"
            }
          ]
        },
        "diagnosticsProfile": {
          "bootDiagnostics": {
            "enabled": true,
            "storageUri": "[reference(resourceId('Microsoft.Storage/storageAccounts', parameters('diagnosticsStorageAccountName'))).primaryEndpoints.blob]"
          }
        }
      }
    },
    {
      "apiVersion" : "2017-10-01",
      "type": "Microsoft.Network/networkSecurityGroups/securityRules",
      "name" : "[concat(variables('clusterNsgName'), '/bootstrap_ssh_in')]",
      "location" : "[variables('location')]",
      "dependsOn" : [
        "[resourceId('Microsoft.Compute/virtualMachines', variables('vmName'))]"
      ],
      "properties": {
        "protocol" : "Tcp",
        "sourcePortRange" : "*",
        "destinationPortRange" : "22",
        "sourceAddressPrefix" : "*",
        "destinationAddressPrefix" : "*",
        "access" : "Allow",
        "priority" : 100,
        "direction" : "Inbound"
      }
    }
  ]
}

Creating the control plane machines in Azure Stack Hub

You must create the control plane machines in Microsoft Azure Stack Hub for your cluster to use. One way to create these machines is to modify the provided Azure Resource Manager (ARM) template.

If you do not use the provided ARM template to create your control plane machines, you must review the provided information and manually create the infrastructure. If your cluster does not initialize correctly, you might have to contact Red Hat support with your installation logs.

Prerequisites
  • Configure an Azure account.

  • Generate the Ignition config files for your cluster.

  • Create and configure a VNet and associated subnets in Azure Stack Hub.

  • Create and configure networking and load balancers in Azure Stack Hub.

  • Create control plane and compute roles.

  • Create the bootstrap machine.

Procedure
  1. Copy the template from the ARM template for control plane machines section of this topic and save it as 05_masters.json in your cluster’s installation directory. This template describes the control plane machines that your cluster requires.

  2. Export the following variable needed by the control plane machine deployment:

    $ export MASTER_IGNITION=`cat <installation_directory>/master.ign | base64 | tr -d '\n'`
  3. Create the deployment by using the az CLI:

    $ az deployment group create -g ${RESOURCE_GROUP} \
      --template-file "<installation_directory>/05_masters.json" \
      --parameters masterIgnition="${MASTER_IGNITION}" \ (1)
      --parameters sshKeyData="${SSH_KEY}" \ (2)
      --parameters baseName="${INFRA_ID}" \ (3)
      --parameters diagnosticsStorageAccountName="${CLUSTER_NAME}sa" (4)
    
    1 The Ignition content for the control plane nodes (also known as the master nodes).
    2 The SSH RSA public key file as a string.
    3 The base name to be used in resource names; this is usually the cluster’s infrastructure ID.
    4 The name of the storage account for your cluster.

ARM template for control plane machines

You can use the following Azure Resource Manager (ARM) template to deploy the control plane machines that you need for your OKD cluster:

05_masters.json ARM template
{
  "$schema" : "https://schema.management.azure.com/schemas/2015-01-01/deploymentTemplate.json#",
  "contentVersion" : "1.0.0.0",
  "parameters" : {
    "baseName" : {
      "type" : "string",
      "minLength" : 1,
      "metadata" : {
        "description" : "Base name to be used in resource names (usually the cluster's Infra ID)"
      }
    },
    "masterIgnition" : {
      "type" : "string",
      "metadata" : {
        "description" : "Ignition content for the master nodes"
      }
    },
    "sshKeyData" : {
      "type" : "securestring",
      "metadata" : {
        "description" : "SSH RSA public key file as a string"
      }
    },
    "diagnosticsStorageAccountName": {
      "type": "string"
    },
    "masterVMSize" : {
      "type" : "string",
      "defaultValue" : "Standard_DS4_v2",
      "metadata" : {
        "description" : "The size of the Master Virtual Machines"
      }
    },
    "diskSizeGB" : {
      "type" : "int",
      "defaultValue" : 1023,
      "metadata" : {
        "description" : "Size of the Master VM OS disk, in GB"
      }
    }
  },
  "variables" : {
    "location" : "[resourceGroup().location]",
    "virtualNetworkName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), '-vnet')]",
    "virtualNetworkID" : "[resourceId('Microsoft.Network/virtualNetworks', variables('virtualNetworkName'))]",
    "masterSubnetName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), '-master-subnet')]",
    "masterSubnetRef" : "[concat(variables('virtualNetworkID'), '/subnets/', variables('masterSubnetName'))]",
    "masterLoadBalancerName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'))]",
    "masterAvailabilitySetName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), '-avset')]",
    "internalLoadBalancerName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), '-internal')]",
    "sshKeyPath" : "/home/core/.ssh/authorized_keys",
    "clusterNsgName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), '-nsg')]",
    "imageName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), '-image')]",
    "numberOfMasters" : 3,
    "vms" : {
      "copy" : [
        {
          "name" : "vmNames",
          "count" :  "[variables('numberOfMasters')]",
          "input" : {
            "name" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), string('-master-'), string(copyIndex('vmNames')))]"
          }
        }
      ]
    }
  },
  "resources" : [
    {
      "name": "[parameters('diagnosticsStorageAccountName')]",
      "type": "Microsoft.Storage/storageAccounts",
      "apiVersion": "2017-10-01",
      "location": "[variables('location')]",
      "properties": {},
      "kind": "Storage",
      "sku": {
        "name": "Standard_LRS"
      }
    },
    {
      "apiVersion" : "2017-10-01",
      "type" : "Microsoft.Network/networkInterfaces",
      "location": "[variables('location')]",
      "copy" : {
        "name" : "nicCopy",
        "count" : "[variables('numberOfMasters')]"
      },
      "name" : "[concat(variables('vms').vmNames[copyIndex()].name, '-nic')]",
      "properties" : {
        "ipConfigurations" : [
          {
            "name" : "pipConfig",
            "properties" : {
              "privateIPAllocationMethod" : "Dynamic",
              "subnet" : {
                "id" : "[variables('masterSubnetRef')]"
              },
              "loadBalancerBackendAddressPools" : [
                {
                  "id" : "[concat('/subscriptions/', subscription().subscriptionId, '/resourceGroups/', resourceGroup().name, '/providers/Microsoft.Network/loadBalancers/', variables('masterLoadBalancerName'), '/backendAddressPools/', variables('masterLoadBalancerName'))]"
                },
                {
                  "id" : "[concat('/subscriptions/', subscription().subscriptionId, '/resourceGroups/', resourceGroup().name, '/providers/Microsoft.Network/loadBalancers/', variables('internalLoadBalancerName'), '/backendAddressPools/', variables('internalLoadBalancerName'))]"
                }
              ]
            }
          }
        ]
      }
    },
    {
      "apiVersion" : "2017-12-01",
      "type" : "Microsoft.Compute/virtualMachines",
      "location" : "[variables('location')]",
      "copy" : {
        "name" : "vmCopy",
        "count" : "[variables('numberOfMasters')]"
      },
      "name" : "[variables('vms').vmNames[copyIndex()].name]",
      "dependsOn" : [
        "[concat('Microsoft.Network/networkInterfaces/', concat(variables('vms').vmNames[copyIndex()].name, '-nic'))]",
        "[concat('Microsoft.Storage/storageAccounts/', parameters('diagnosticsStorageAccountName'))]"
      ],
      "properties" : {
        "availabilitySet": {
          "id": "[resourceId('Microsoft.Compute/availabilitySets',variables('masterAvailabilitySetName'))]"
        },
        "hardwareProfile" : {
          "vmSize" : "[parameters('masterVMSize')]"
        },
        "osProfile" : {
          "computerName" : "[variables('vms').vmNames[copyIndex()].name]",
          "adminUsername" : "core",
          "customData" : "[parameters('masterIgnition')]",
          "linuxConfiguration" : {
            "disablePasswordAuthentication" : true,
            "ssh" : {
              "publicKeys" : [
                {
                  "path" : "[variables('sshKeyPath')]",
                  "keyData" : "[parameters('sshKeyData')]"
                }
              ]
            }
          }
        },
        "storageProfile" : {
          "imageReference": {
            "id": "[resourceId('Microsoft.Compute/images', variables('imageName'))]"
          },
          "osDisk" : {
            "name": "[concat(variables('vms').vmNames[copyIndex()].name, '_OSDisk')]",
            "osType" : "Linux",
            "createOption" : "FromImage",
            "writeAcceleratorEnabled": false,
            "managedDisk": {
              "storageAccountType": "Standard_LRS"
            },
            "diskSizeGB" : "[parameters('diskSizeGB')]"
          }
        },
        "networkProfile" : {
          "networkInterfaces" : [
            {
              "id" : "[resourceId('Microsoft.Network/networkInterfaces', concat(variables('vms').vmNames[copyIndex()].name, '-nic'))]",
              "properties": {
                "primary": false
              }
            }
          ]
        },
        "diagnosticsProfile": {
          "bootDiagnostics": {
            "enabled": true,
            "storageUri": "[reference(resourceId('Microsoft.Storage/storageAccounts', parameters('diagnosticsStorageAccountName'))).primaryEndpoints.blob]"
          }
        }
      }
    }
  ]
}

Wait for bootstrap completion and remove bootstrap resources in Azure Stack Hub

After you create all of the required infrastructure in Microsoft Azure Stack Hub, wait for the bootstrap process to complete on the machines that you provisioned by using the Ignition config files that you generated with the installation program.

Prerequisites
  • Configure an Azure account.

  • Generate the Ignition config files for your cluster.

  • Create and configure a VNet and associated subnets in Azure Stack Hub.

  • Create and configure networking and load balancers in Azure Stack Hub.

  • Create control plane and compute roles.

  • Create the bootstrap machine.

  • Create the control plane machines.

Procedure
  1. Change to the directory that contains the installation program and run the following command:

    $ ./openshift-install wait-for bootstrap-complete --dir=<installation_directory> \ (1)
        --log-level info (2)
    
    1 For <installation_directory>, specify the path to the directory that you stored the installation files in.
    2 To view different installation details, specify warn, debug, or error instead of info.

    If the command exits without a FATAL warning, your production control plane has initialized.

  2. Delete the bootstrap resources:

    $ az network nsg rule delete -g ${RESOURCE_GROUP} --nsg-name ${INFRA_ID}-nsg --name bootstrap_ssh_in
    $ az vm stop -g ${RESOURCE_GROUP} --name ${INFRA_ID}-bootstrap
    $ az vm deallocate -g ${RESOURCE_GROUP} --name ${INFRA_ID}-bootstrap
    $ az vm delete -g ${RESOURCE_GROUP} --name ${INFRA_ID}-bootstrap --yes
    $ az disk delete -g ${RESOURCE_GROUP} --name ${INFRA_ID}-bootstrap_OSDisk --no-wait --yes
    $ az network nic delete -g ${RESOURCE_GROUP} --name ${INFRA_ID}-bootstrap-nic --no-wait
    $ az storage blob delete --account-key ${ACCOUNT_KEY} --account-name ${CLUSTER_NAME}sa --container-name files --name bootstrap.ign
    $ az network public-ip delete -g ${RESOURCE_GROUP} --name ${INFRA_ID}-bootstrap-ssh-pip

Creating additional worker machines in Azure Stack Hub

You can create worker machines in Microsoft Azure Stack Hub for your cluster to use by launching individual instances discretely or by automated processes outside the cluster, such as auto scaling groups. You can also take advantage of the built-in cluster scaling mechanisms and the machine API in OKD.

In this example, you manually launch one instance by using the Azure Resource Manager (ARM) template. Additional instances can be launched by including additional resources of type 06_workers.json in the file.

If you do not use the provided ARM template to create your worker machines, you must review the provided information and manually create the infrastructure. If your cluster does not initialize correctly, you might have to contact Red Hat support with your installation logs.

Prerequisites
  • Configure an Azure account.

  • Generate the Ignition config files for your cluster.

  • Create and configure a VNet and associated subnets in Azure Stack Hub.

  • Create and configure networking and load balancers in Azure Stack Hub.

  • Create control plane and compute roles.

  • Create the bootstrap machine.

  • Create the control plane machines.

Procedure
  1. Copy the template from the ARM template for worker machines section of this topic and save it as 06_workers.json in your cluster’s installation directory. This template describes the worker machines that your cluster requires.

  2. Export the following variable needed by the worker machine deployment:

    $ export WORKER_IGNITION=`cat <installation_directory>/worker.ign | base64 | tr -d '\n'`
  3. Create the deployment by using the az CLI:

    $ az deployment group create -g ${RESOURCE_GROUP} \
      --template-file "<installation_directory>/06_workers.json" \
      --parameters workerIgnition="${WORKER_IGNITION}" \ (1)
      --parameters sshKeyData="${SSH_KEY}" \ (2)
      --parameters baseName="${INFRA_ID}" (3)
      --parameters diagnosticsStorageAccountName="${CLUSTER_NAME}sa" (4)
    
    1 The Ignition content for the worker nodes.
    2 The SSH RSA public key file as a string.
    3 The base name to be used in resource names; this is usually the cluster’s infrastructure ID.
    4 The name of the storage account for your cluster.

ARM template for worker machines

You can use the following Azure Resource Manager (ARM) template to deploy the worker machines that you need for your OKD cluster:

06_workers.json ARM template
{
  "$schema" : "https://schema.management.azure.com/schemas/2015-01-01/deploymentTemplate.json#",
  "contentVersion" : "1.0.0.0",
  "parameters" : {
    "baseName" : {
      "type" : "string",
      "minLength" : 1,
      "metadata" : {
        "description" : "Base name to be used in resource names (usually the cluster's Infra ID)"
      }
    },
    "workerIgnition" : {
      "type" : "string",
      "metadata" : {
        "description" : "Ignition content for the worker nodes"
      }
    },
    "numberOfNodes" : {
      "type" : "int",
      "defaultValue" : 3,
      "minValue" : 2,
      "maxValue" : 30,
      "metadata" : {
        "description" : "Number of OpenShift compute nodes to deploy"
      }
    },
    "sshKeyData" : {
      "type" : "securestring",
      "metadata" : {
        "description" : "SSH RSA public key file as a string"
      }
    },
    "diagnosticsStorageAccountName": {
      "type": "string"
    },
    "nodeVMSize" : {
      "type" : "string",
      "defaultValue" : "Standard_DS4_v2",
      "metadata" : {
        "description" : "The size of the each Node Virtual Machine"
      }
    }
  },
  "variables" : {
    "location" : "[resourceGroup().location]",
    "virtualNetworkName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), '-vnet')]",
    "virtualNetworkID" : "[resourceId('Microsoft.Network/virtualNetworks', variables('virtualNetworkName'))]",
    "nodeSubnetName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), '-worker-subnet')]",
    "nodeSubnetRef" : "[concat(variables('virtualNetworkID'), '/subnets/', variables('nodeSubnetName'))]",
    "infraLoadBalancerName" : "[parameters('baseName')]",
    "sshKeyPath" : "/home/core/.ssh/authorized_keys",
    "identityName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), '-identity')]",
    "imageName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), '-image')]",
    "masterAvailabilitySetName" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), '-avset')]",
    "numberOfNodes" : "[parameters('numberOfNodes')]",
    "vms" : {
      "copy" : [
        {
        "name" : "vmNames",
        "count" :  "[parameters('numberOfNodes')]",
        "input" : {
            "name" : "[concat(parameters('baseName'), string('-worker-'), string(copyIndex('vmNames')))]"
        }
      }
    ]
  }
  },
  "resources" : [
    {
      "name": "[parameters('diagnosticsStorageAccountName')]",
      "type": "Microsoft.Storage/storageAccounts",
      "apiVersion": "2017-10-01",
      "location": "[variables('location')]",
      "properties": {},
      "kind": "Storage",
      "sku": {
        "name": "Standard_LRS"
      }
    },
    {
      "apiVersion" : "2017-10-01",
      "type" : "Microsoft.Network/networkInterfaces",
      "location": "[variables('location')]",
      "copy" : {
        "name" : "nicCopy",
        "count" : "[variables('numberOfNodes')]"
      },
      "name" : "[concat(variables('vms').vmNames[copyIndex()].name, '-nic')]",
      "properties" : {
        "ipConfigurations" : [
          {
            "name" : "pipConfig",
            "properties" : {
              "privateIPAllocationMethod" : "Dynamic",
              "subnet" : {
                "id" : "[variables('nodeSubnetRef')]"
              }
            }
          }
        ]
      }
    },
    {
      "apiVersion" : "2017-12-01",
      "type" : "Microsoft.Compute/virtualMachines",
      "location" : "[variables('location')]",
      "copy" : {
        "name" : "vmCopy",
        "count" : "[variables('numberOfNodes')]"
      },
      "name" : "[variables('vms').vmNames[copyIndex()].name]",
      "dependsOn" : [
        "[concat('Microsoft.Network/networkInterfaces/', concat(variables('vms').vmNames[copyIndex()].name, '-nic'))]",
        "[concat('Microsoft.Storage/storageAccounts/', parameters('diagnosticsStorageAccountName'))]"
      ],
      "properties" : {
        "availabilitySet": {
          "id": "[resourceId('Microsoft.Compute/availabilitySets',variables('masterAvailabilitySetName'))]"
        },
        "hardwareProfile" : {
          "vmSize" : "[parameters('nodeVMSize')]"
        },
        "osProfile" : {
          "computerName" : "[variables('vms').vmNames[copyIndex()].name]",
          "adminUsername" : "core",
          "customData" : "[parameters('workerIgnition')]",
          "linuxConfiguration" : {
            "disablePasswordAuthentication" : true,
            "ssh" : {
              "publicKeys" : [
                {
                  "path" : "[variables('sshKeyPath')]",
                  "keyData" : "[parameters('sshKeyData')]"
                }
              ]
            }
          }
        },
        "storageProfile" : {
          "imageReference": {
            "id": "[resourceId('Microsoft.Compute/images', variables('imageName'))]"
          },
          "osDisk" : {
            "name": "[concat(variables('vms').vmNames[copyIndex()].name,'_OSDisk')]",
            "osType" : "Linux",
            "createOption" : "FromImage",
            "managedDisk": {
              "storageAccountType": "Standard_LRS"
            },
            "diskSizeGB": 128
          }
        },
        "networkProfile" : {
          "networkInterfaces" : [
            {
              "id" : "[resourceId('Microsoft.Network/networkInterfaces', concat(variables('vms').vmNames[copyIndex()].name, '-nic'))]",
              "properties": {
                "primary": true
              }
            }
          ]
        },
        "diagnosticsProfile": {
          "bootDiagnostics": {
            "enabled": true,
            "storageUri": "[reference(resourceId('Microsoft.Storage/storageAccounts', parameters('diagnosticsStorageAccountName'))).primaryEndpoints.blob]"
          }
        }
      }
    }
  ]
}

Installing the OpenShift CLI by downloading the binary

You can install the OpenShift CLI (oc) to interact with OKD from a command-line interface. You can install oc on Linux, Windows, or macOS.

If you installed an earlier version of oc, you cannot use it to complete all of the commands in OKD 4. Download and install the new version of oc.

Installing the OpenShift CLI on Linux

You can install the OpenShift CLI (oc) binary on Linux by using the following procedure.

Procedure
  1. Navigate to https://mirror.openshift.com/pub/openshift-v4/clients/oc/latest/ and choose the folder for your operating system and architecture.

  2. Download oc.tar.gz.

  3. Unpack the archive:

    $ tar xvzf <file>
  4. Place the oc binary in a directory that is on your PATH.

    To check your PATH, execute the following command:

    $ echo $PATH

After you install the OpenShift CLI, it is available using the oc command:

$ oc <command>

Installing the OpenShift CLI on Windows

You can install the OpenShift CLI (oc) binary on Windows by using the following procedure.

Procedure
  1. Navigate to https://mirror.openshift.com/pub/openshift-v4/clients/oc/latest/ and choose the folder for your operating system and architecture.

  2. Download oc.zip.

  3. Unzip the archive with a ZIP program.

  4. Move the oc binary to a directory that is on your PATH.

    To check your PATH, open the command prompt and execute the following command:

    C:\> path

After you install the OpenShift CLI, it is available using the oc command:

C:\> oc <command>

Installing the OpenShift CLI on macOS

You can install the OpenShift CLI (oc) binary on macOS by using the following procedure.

Procedure
  1. Navigate to https://mirror.openshift.com/pub/openshift-v4/clients/oc/latest/ and choose the folder for your operating system and architecture.

  2. Download oc.tar.gz.

  3. Unpack and unzip the archive.

  4. Move the oc binary to a directory on your PATH.

    To check your PATH, open a terminal and execute the following command:

    $ echo