This reference provides descriptions and example commands for OpenShift CLI (oc) developer commands. For administrator commands, see the OpenShift CLI administrator command reference.

Run oc help to list all commands or run oc <command> --help to get additional details for a specific command.

OpenShift CLI (oc) developer commands

oc annotate

Update the annotations on a resource

Example usage
  # Update pod 'foo' with the annotation 'description' and the value 'my frontend'.
  # If the same annotation is set multiple times, only the last value will be applied
  oc annotate pods foo description='my frontend'

  # Update a pod identified by type and name in "pod.json"
  oc annotate -f pod.json description='my frontend'

  # Update pod 'foo' with the annotation 'description' and the value 'my frontend running nginx', overwriting any existing value.
  oc annotate --overwrite pods foo description='my frontend running nginx'

  # Update all pods in the namespace
  oc annotate pods --all description='my frontend running nginx'

  # Update pod 'foo' only if the resource is unchanged from version 1.
  oc annotate pods foo description='my frontend running nginx' --resource-version=1

  # Update pod 'foo' by removing an annotation named 'description' if it exists.
  # Does not require the --overwrite flag.
  oc annotate pods foo description-

oc api-resources

Print the supported API resources on the server

Example usage
  # Print the supported API Resources
  oc api-resources

  # Print the supported API Resources with more information
  oc api-resources -o wide

  # Print the supported API Resources sorted by a column
  oc api-resources --sort-by=name

  # Print the supported namespaced resources
  oc api-resources --namespaced=true

  # Print the supported non-namespaced resources
  oc api-resources --namespaced=false

  # Print the supported API Resources with specific APIGroup
  oc api-resources --api-group=extensions

oc api-versions

Print the supported API versions on the server, in the form of "group/version"

Example usage
  # Print the supported API versions
  oc api-versions

oc apply

Apply a configuration to a resource by filename or stdin

Example usage
  # Apply the configuration in pod.json to a pod.
  oc apply -f ./pod.json

  # Apply resources from a directory containing kustomization.yaml - e.g. dir/kustomization.yaml.
  oc apply -k dir/

  # Apply the JSON passed into stdin to a pod.
  cat pod.json | oc apply -f -

  # Note: --prune is still in Alpha
  # Apply the configuration in manifest.yaml that matches label app=nginx and delete all the other resources that are not in the file and match label app=nginx.
  oc apply --prune -f manifest.yaml -l app=nginx

  # Apply the configuration in manifest.yaml and delete all the other configmaps that are not in the file.
  oc apply --prune -f manifest.yaml --all --prune-whitelist=core/v1/ConfigMap

oc apply edit-last-applied

Edit latest last-applied-configuration annotations of a resource/object

Example usage
  # Edit the last-applied-configuration annotations by type/name in YAML.
  oc apply edit-last-applied deployment/nginx

  # Edit the last-applied-configuration annotations by file in JSON.
  oc apply edit-last-applied -f deploy.yaml -o json

oc apply set-last-applied

Set the last-applied-configuration annotation on a live object to match the contents of a file.

Example usage
  # Set the last-applied-configuration of a resource to match the contents of a file.
  oc apply set-last-applied -f deploy.yaml

  # Execute set-last-applied against each configuration file in a directory.
  oc apply set-last-applied -f path/

  # Set the last-applied-configuration of a resource to match the contents of a file, will create the annotation if it does not already exist.
  oc apply set-last-applied -f deploy.yaml --create-annotation=true

oc apply view-last-applied

View latest last-applied-configuration annotations of a resource/object

Example usage
  # View the last-applied-configuration annotations by type/name in YAML.
  oc apply view-last-applied deployment/nginx

  # View the last-applied-configuration annotations by file in JSON
  oc apply view-last-applied -f deploy.yaml -o json

oc attach

Attach to a running container

Example usage
  # Get output from running pod mypod, use the oc.kubernetes.io/default-container annotation
  # for selecting the container to be attached or the first container in the pod will be chosen
  oc attach mypod

  # Get output from ruby-container from pod mypod
  oc attach mypod -c ruby-container

  # Switch to raw terminal mode, sends stdin to 'bash' in ruby-container from pod mypod
  # and sends stdout/stderr from 'bash' back to the client
  oc attach mypod -c ruby-container -i -t

  # Get output from the first pod of a ReplicaSet named nginx
  oc attach rs/nginx

oc auth can-i

Check whether an action is allowed

Example usage
  # Check to see if I can create pods in any namespace
  oc auth can-i create pods --all-namespaces

  # Check to see if I can list deployments in my current namespace
  oc auth can-i list deployments.apps

  # Check to see if I can do everything in my current namespace ("*" means all)
  oc auth can-i '*' '*'

  # Check to see if I can get the job named "bar" in namespace "foo"
  oc auth can-i list jobs.batch/bar -n foo

  # Check to see if I can read pod logs
  oc auth can-i get pods --subresource=log

  # Check to see if I can access the URL /logs/
  oc auth can-i get /logs/

  # List all allowed actions in namespace "foo"
  oc auth can-i --list --namespace=foo

oc auth reconcile

Reconciles rules for RBAC Role, RoleBinding, ClusterRole, and ClusterRoleBinding objects

Example usage
  # Reconcile rbac resources from a file
  oc auth reconcile -f my-rbac-rules.yaml

oc autoscale

Autoscale a deployment config, deployment, replica set, stateful set, or replication controller

Example usage
  # Auto scale a deployment "foo", with the number of pods between 2 and 10, no target CPU utilization specified so a default autoscaling policy will be used:
  oc autoscale deployment foo --min=2 --max=10

  # Auto scale a replication controller "foo", with the number of pods between 1 and 5, target CPU utilization at 80%:
  oc autoscale rc foo --max=5 --cpu-percent=80

oc cancel-build

Cancel running, pending, or new builds

Example usage
  # Cancel the build with the given name
  oc cancel-build ruby-build-2

  # Cancel the named build and print the build logs
  oc cancel-build ruby-build-2 --dump-logs

  # Cancel the named build and create a new one with the same parameters
  oc cancel-build ruby-build-2 --restart

  # Cancel multiple builds
  oc cancel-build ruby-build-1 ruby-build-2 ruby-build-3

  # Cancel all builds created from the 'ruby-build' build config that are in the 'new' state
  oc cancel-build bc/ruby-build --state=new

oc cluster-info

Display cluster info

Example usage
  # Print the address of the control plane and cluster services
  oc cluster-info

oc cluster-info dump

Dump lots of relevant info for debugging and diagnosis

Example usage
  # Dump current cluster state to stdout
  oc cluster-info dump

  # Dump current cluster state to /path/to/cluster-state
  oc cluster-info dump --output-directory=/path/to/cluster-state

  # Dump all namespaces to stdout
  oc cluster-info dump --all-namespaces

  # Dump a set of namespaces to /path/to/cluster-state
  oc cluster-info dump --namespaces default,kube-system --output-directory=/path/to/cluster-state

oc completion

Output shell completion code for the specified shell (bash or zsh)

Example usage
  # Installing bash completion on macOS using homebrew
  ## If running Bash 3.2 included with macOS
  brew install bash-completion
  ## or, if running Bash 4.1+
  brew install bash-completion@2
  ## If oc is installed via homebrew, this should start working immediately.
  ## If you've installed via other means, you may need add the completion to your completion directory
  oc completion bash > $(brew --prefix)/etc/bash_completion.d/oc


  # Installing bash completion on Linux
  ## If bash-completion is not installed on Linux, please install the 'bash-completion' package
  ## via your distribution's package manager.
  ## Load the oc completion code for bash into the current shell
  source <(oc completion bash)
  ## Write bash completion code to a file and source it from .bash_profile
  oc completion bash > ~/.kube/completion.bash.inc
  printf "
  # Kubectl shell completion
  source '$HOME/.kube/completion.bash.inc'
  " >> $HOME/.bash_profile
  source $HOME/.bash_profile

  # Load the oc completion code for zsh[1] into the current shell
  source <(oc completion zsh)
  # Set the oc completion code for zsh[1] to autoload on startup
  oc completion zsh > "${fpath[1]}/_oc"

oc config current-context

Displays the current-context

Example usage
  # Display the current-context
  oc config current-context

oc config delete-cluster

Delete the specified cluster from the kubeconfig

Example usage
  # Delete the minikube cluster
  oc config delete-cluster minikube

oc config delete-context

Delete the specified context from the kubeconfig

Example usage
  # Delete the context for the minikube cluster
  oc config delete-context minikube

oc config delete-user

Delete the specified user from the kubeconfig

Example usage
  # Delete the minikube user
  oc config delete-user minikube

oc config get-clusters

Display clusters defined in the kubeconfig

Example usage
  # List the clusters oc knows about
  oc config get-clusters

oc config get-contexts

Describe one or many contexts

Example usage
  # List all the contexts in your kubeconfig file
  oc config get-contexts

  # Describe one context in your kubeconfig file.
  oc config get-contexts my-context

oc config get-users

Display users defined in the kubeconfig

Example usage
  # List the users oc knows about
  oc config get-users

oc config rename-context

Renames a context from the kubeconfig file.

Example usage
  # Rename the context 'old-name' to 'new-name' in your kubeconfig file
  oc config rename-context old-name new-name

oc config set

Sets an individual value in a kubeconfig file

Example usage
  # Set server field on the my-cluster cluster to https://1.2.3.4
  oc config set clusters.my-cluster.server https://1.2.3.4

  # Set certificate-authority-data field on the my-cluster cluster.
  oc config set clusters.my-cluster.certificate-authority-data $(echo "cert_data_here" | base64 -i -)

  # Set cluster field in the my-context context to my-cluster.
  oc config set contexts.my-context.cluster my-cluster

  # Set client-key-data field in the cluster-admin user using --set-raw-bytes option.
  oc config set users.cluster-admin.client-key-data cert_data_here --set-raw-bytes=true

oc config set-cluster

Sets a cluster entry in kubeconfig

Example usage
  # Set only the server field on the e2e cluster entry without touching other values.
  oc config set-cluster e2e --server=https://1.2.3.4

  # Embed certificate authority data for the e2e cluster entry
  oc config set-cluster e2e --embed-certs --certificate-authority=~/.kube/e2e/kubernetes.ca.crt

  # Disable cert checking for the dev cluster entry
  oc config set-cluster e2e --insecure-skip-tls-verify=true

  # Set custom TLS server name to use for validation for the e2e cluster entry
  oc config set-cluster e2e --tls-server-name=my-cluster-name

oc config set-context

Sets a context entry in kubeconfig

Example usage
  # Set the user field on the gce context entry without touching other values
  oc config set-context gce --user=cluster-admin

oc config set-credentials

Sets a user entry in kubeconfig

Example usage
  # Set only the "client-key" field on the "cluster-admin"
  # entry, without touching other values:
  oc config set-credentials cluster-admin --client-key=~/.kube/admin.key

  # Set basic auth for the "cluster-admin" entry
  oc config set-credentials cluster-admin --username=admin --password=uXFGweU9l35qcif

  # Embed client certificate data in the "cluster-admin" entry
  oc config set-credentials cluster-admin --client-certificate=~/.kube/admin.crt --embed-certs=true

  # Enable the Google Compute Platform auth provider for the "cluster-admin" entry
  oc config set-credentials cluster-admin --auth-provider=gcp

  # Enable the OpenID Connect auth provider for the "cluster-admin" entry with additional args
  oc config set-credentials cluster-admin --auth-provider=oidc --auth-provider-arg=client-id=foo --auth-provider-arg=client-secret=bar

  # Remove the "client-secret" config value for the OpenID Connect auth provider for the "cluster-admin" entry
  oc config set-credentials cluster-admin --auth-provider=oidc --auth-provider-arg=client-secret-

  # Enable new exec auth plugin for the "cluster-admin" entry
  oc config set-credentials cluster-admin --exec-command=/path/to/the/executable --exec-api-version=client.authentication.k8s.io/v1beta1

  # Define new exec auth plugin args for the "cluster-admin" entry
  oc config set-credentials cluster-admin --exec-arg=arg1 --exec-arg=arg2

  # Create or update exec auth plugin environment variables for the "cluster-admin" entry
  oc config set-credentials cluster-admin --exec-env=key1=val1 --exec-env=key2=val2

  # Remove exec auth plugin environment variables for the "cluster-admin" entry
  oc config set-credentials cluster-admin --exec-env=var-to-remove-

oc config unset

Unsets an individual value in a kubeconfig file

Example usage
  # Unset the current-context.
  oc config unset current-context

  # Unset namespace in foo context.
  oc config unset contexts.foo.namespace

oc config use-context

Sets the current-context in a kubeconfig file

Example usage
  # Use the context for the minikube cluster
  oc config use-context minikube

oc config view

Display merged kubeconfig settings or a specified kubeconfig file

Example usage
  # Show merged kubeconfig settings.
  oc config view

  # Show merged kubeconfig settings and raw certificate data.
  oc config view --raw

  # Get the password for the e2e user
  oc config view -o jsonpath='{.users[?(@.name == "e2e")].user.password}'

oc cp

Copy files and directories to and from containers.

Example usage
  # !!!Important Note!!!
  # Requires that the 'tar' binary is present in your container
  # image.  If 'tar' is not present, 'oc cp' will fail.
  #
  # For advanced use cases, such as symlinks, wildcard expansion or
  # file mode preservation consider using 'oc exec'.

  # Copy /tmp/foo local file to /tmp/bar in a remote pod in namespace <some-namespace>
  tar cf - /tmp/foo | oc exec -i -n <some-namespace> <some-pod> -- tar xf - -C /tmp/bar

  # Copy /tmp/foo from a remote pod to /tmp/bar locally
  oc exec -n <some-namespace> <some-pod> -- tar cf - /tmp/foo | tar xf - -C /tmp/bar

  # Copy /tmp/foo_dir local directory to /tmp/bar_dir in a remote pod in the default namespace
  oc cp /tmp/foo_dir <some-pod>:/tmp/bar_dir

  # Copy /tmp/foo local file to /tmp/bar in a remote pod in a specific container
  oc cp /tmp/foo <some-pod>:/tmp/bar -c <specific-container>

  # Copy /tmp/foo local file to /tmp/bar in a remote pod in namespace <some-namespace>
  oc cp /tmp/foo <some-namespace>/<some-pod>:/tmp/bar

  # Copy /tmp/foo from a remote pod to /tmp/bar locally
  oc cp <some-namespace>/<some-pod>:/tmp/foo /tmp/bar

oc create

Create a resource from a file or from stdin.

Example usage
  # Create a pod using the data in pod.json.
  oc create -f ./pod.json

  # Create a pod based on the JSON passed into stdin.
  cat pod.json | oc create -f -

  # Edit the data in docker-registry.yaml in JSON then create the resource using the edited data.
  oc create -f docker-registry.yaml --edit -o json

oc create build

Create a new build

Example usage
  # Create a new build
  oc create build myapp

oc create clusterresourcequota

Create a cluster resource quota

Example usage
  # Create a cluster resource quota limited to 10 pods
  oc create clusterresourcequota limit-bob --project-annotation-selector=openshift.io/requester=user-bob --hard=pods=10

oc create clusterrole

Create a ClusterRole.

Example usage
  # Create a ClusterRole named "pod-reader" that allows user to perform "get", "watch" and "list" on pods
  oc create clusterrole pod-reader --verb=get,list,watch --resource=pods

  # Create a ClusterRole named "pod-reader" with ResourceName specified
  oc create clusterrole pod-reader --verb=get --resource=pods --resource-name=readablepod --resource-name=anotherpod

  # Create a ClusterRole named "foo" with API Group specified
  oc create clusterrole foo --verb=get,list,watch --resource=rs.extensions

  # Create a ClusterRole named "foo" with SubResource specified
  oc create clusterrole foo --verb=get,list,watch --resource=pods,pods/status

  # Create a ClusterRole name "foo" with NonResourceURL specified
  oc create clusterrole "foo" --verb=get --non-resource-url=/logs/*

  # Create a ClusterRole name "monitoring" with AggregationRule specified
  oc create clusterrole monitoring --aggregation-rule="rbac.example.com/aggregate-to-monitoring=true"

oc create clusterrolebinding

Create a ClusterRoleBinding for a particular ClusterRole

Example usage
  # Create a ClusterRoleBinding for user1, user2, and group1 using the cluster-admin ClusterRole
  oc create clusterrolebinding cluster-admin --clusterrole=cluster-admin --user=user1 --user=user2 --group=group1

oc create configmap

Create a configmap from a local file, directory or literal value

Example usage
  # Create a new configmap named my-config based on folder bar
  oc create configmap my-config --from-file=path/to/bar

  # Create a new configmap named my-config with specified keys instead of file basenames on disk
  oc create configmap my-config --from-file=key1=/path/to/bar/file1.txt --from-file=key2=/path/to/bar/file2.txt

  # Create a new configmap named my-config with key1=config1 and key2=config2
  oc create configmap my-config --from-literal=key1=config1 --from-literal=key2=config2

  # Create a new configmap named my-config from the key=value pairs in the file
  oc create configmap my-config --from-file=path/to/bar

  # Create a new configmap named my-config from an env file
  oc create configmap my-config --from-env-file=path/to/bar.env

oc create cronjob

Create a cronjob with the specified name.

Example usage
  # Create a cronjob
  oc create cronjob my-job --image=busybox --schedule="*/1 * * * *"

  # Create a cronjob with command
  oc create cronjob my-job --image=busybox --schedule="*/1 * * * *" -- date

oc create deployment

Create a deployment with the specified name.

Example usage
  # Create a deployment named my-dep that runs the busybox image.
  oc create deployment my-dep --image=busybox

  # Create a deployment with command
  oc create deployment my-dep --image=busybox -- date

  # Create a deployment named my-dep that runs the nginx image with 3 replicas.
  oc create deployment my-dep --image=nginx --replicas=3

  # Create a deployment named my-dep that runs the busybox image and expose port 5701.
  oc create deployment my-dep --image=busybox --port=5701

oc create deploymentconfig

Create a deployment config with default options that uses a given image

Example usage
  # Create an nginx deployment config named my-nginx
  oc create deploymentconfig my-nginx --image=nginx

oc create identity

Manually create an identity (only needed if automatic creation is disabled)

Example usage
  # Create an identity with identity provider "acme_ldap" and the identity provider username "adamjones"
  oc create identity acme_ldap:adamjones

oc create imagestream

Create a new empty image stream

Example usage
  # Create a new image stream
  oc create imagestream mysql

oc create imagestreamtag

Create a new image stream tag

Example usage
  # Create a new image stream tag based on an image in a remote registry
  oc create imagestreamtag mysql:latest --from-image=myregistry.local/mysql/mysql:5.0

oc create ingress

Create an ingress with the specified name.

Example usage
  # Create a single ingress called 'simple' that directs requests to foo.com/bar to svc
  # svc1:8080 with a tls secret "my-cert"
  oc create ingress simple --rule="foo.com/bar=svc1:8080,tls=my-cert"

  # Create a catch all ingress of "/path" pointing to service svc:port and Ingress Class as "otheringress"
  oc create ingress catch-all --class=otheringress --rule="/path=svc:port"

  # Create an ingress with two annotations: ingress.annotation1 and ingress.annotations2
  oc create ingress annotated --class=default --rule="foo.com/bar=svc:port" \
  --annotation ingress.annotation1=foo \
  --annotation ingress.annotation2=bla

  # Create an ingress with the same host and multiple paths
  oc create ingress multipath --class=default \
  --rule="foo.com/=svc:port" \
  --rule="foo.com/admin/=svcadmin:portadmin"

  # Create an ingress with multiple hosts and the pathType as Prefix
  oc create ingress ingress1 --class=default \
  --rule="foo.com/path*=svc:8080" \
  --rule="bar.com/admin*=svc2:http"

  # Create an ingress with TLS enabled using the default ingress certificate and different path types
  oc create ingress ingtls --class=default \
  --rule="foo.com/=svc:https,tls" \
  --rule="foo.com/path/subpath*=othersvc:8080"

  # Create an ingress with TLS enabled using a specific secret and pathType as Prefix
  oc create ingress ingsecret --class=default \
  --rule="foo.com/*=svc:8080,tls=secret1"

  # Create an ingress with a default backend
  oc create ingress ingdefault --class=default \
  --default-backend=defaultsvc:http \
  --rule="foo.com/*=svc:8080,tls=secret1"

oc create job

Create a job with the specified name.

Example usage
  # Create a job
  oc create job my-job --image=busybox

  # Create a job with command
  oc create job my-job --image=busybox -- date

  # Create a job from a CronJob named "a-cronjob"
  oc create job test-job --from=cronjob/a-cronjob

oc create namespace

Create a namespace with the specified name

Example usage
  # Create a new namespace named my-namespace
  oc create namespace my-namespace

oc create poddisruptionbudget

Create a pod disruption budget with the specified name.

Example usage
  # Create a pod disruption budget named my-pdb that will select all pods with the app=rails label
  # and require at least one of them being available at any point in time.
  oc create poddisruptionbudget my-pdb --selector=app=rails --min-available=1

  # Create a pod disruption budget named my-pdb that will select all pods with the app=nginx label
  # and require at least half of the pods selected to be available at any point in time.
  oc create pdb my-pdb --selector=app=nginx --min-available=50%

oc create priorityclass

Create a priorityclass with the specified name.

Example usage
  # Create a priorityclass named high-priority
  oc create priorityclass high-priority --value=1000 --description="high priority"

  # Create a priorityclass named default-priority that considered as the global default priority
  oc create priorityclass default-priority --value=1000 --global-default=true --description="default priority"

  # Create a priorityclass named high-priority that can not preempt pods with lower priority
  oc create priorityclass high-priority --value=1000 --description="high priority" --preemption-policy="Never"

oc create quota

Create a quota with the specified name.

Example usage
  # Create a new resourcequota named my-quota
  oc create quota my-quota --hard=cpu=1,memory=1G,pods=2,services=3,replicationcontrollers=2,resourcequotas=1,secrets=5,persistentvolumeclaims=10

  # Create a new resourcequota named best-effort
  oc create quota best-effort --hard=pods=100 --scopes=BestEffort

oc create role

Create a role with single rule.

Example usage
  # Create a Role named "pod-reader" that allows user to perform "get", "watch" and "list" on pods
  oc create role pod-reader --verb=get --verb=list --verb=watch --resource=pods

  # Create a Role named "pod-reader" with ResourceName specified
  oc create role pod-reader --verb=get --resource=pods --resource-name=readablepod --resource-name=anotherpod

  # Create a Role named "foo" with API Group specified
  oc create role foo --verb=get,list,watch --resource=rs.extensions

  # Create a Role named "foo" with SubResource specified
  oc create role foo --verb=get,list,watch --resource=pods,pods/status

oc create rolebinding

Create a RoleBinding for a particular Role or ClusterRole

Example usage
  # Create a RoleBinding for user1, user2, and group1 using the admin ClusterRole
  oc create rolebinding admin --clusterrole=admin --user=user1 --user=user2 --group=group1

oc create route edge

Create a route that uses edge TLS termination

Example usage
  # Create an edge route named "my-route" that exposes the frontend service
  oc create route edge my-route --service=frontend

  # Create an edge route that exposes the frontend service and specify a path
  # If the route name is omitted, the service name will be used
  oc create route edge --service=frontend --path /assets

oc create route passthrough

Create a route that uses passthrough TLS termination

Example usage
  # Create a passthrough route named "my-route" that exposes the frontend service
  oc create route passthrough my-route --service=frontend

  # Create a passthrough route that exposes the frontend service and specify
  # a host name. If the route name is omitted, the service name will be used
  oc create route passthrough --service=frontend --hostname=www.example.com

oc create route reencrypt

Create a route that uses reencrypt TLS termination

Example usage
  # Create a route named "my-route" that exposes the frontend service
  oc create route reencrypt my-route --service=frontend --dest-ca-cert cert.cert

  # Create a reencrypt route that exposes the frontend service, letting the
  # route name default to the service name and the destination CA certificate
  # default to the service CA
  oc create route reencrypt --service=frontend

oc create secret docker-registry

Create a secret for use with a Docker registry

Example usage
  # If you don't already have a .dockercfg file, you can create a dockercfg secret directly by using:
  oc create secret docker-registry my-secret --docker-server=DOCKER_REGISTRY_SERVER --docker-username=DOCKER_USER --docker-password=DOCKER_PASSWORD --docker-email=DOCKER_EMAIL

  # Create a new secret named my-secret from ~/.docker/config.json
  oc create secret docker-registry my-secret --from-file=.dockerconfigjson=path/to/.docker/config.json

oc create secret generic

Create a secret from a local file, directory or literal value

Example usage
  # Create a new secret named my-secret with keys for each file in folder bar
  oc create secret generic my-secret --from-file=path/to/bar

  # Create a new secret named my-secret with specified keys instead of names on disk
  oc create secret generic my-secret --from-file=ssh-privatekey=path/to/id_rsa --from-file=ssh-publickey=path/to/id_rsa.pub

  # Create a new secret named my-secret with key1=supersecret and key2=topsecret
  oc create secret generic my-secret --from-literal=key1=supersecret --from-literal=key2=topsecret

  # Create a new secret named my-secret using a combination of a file and a literal
  oc create secret generic my-secret --from-file=ssh-privatekey=path/to/id_rsa --from-literal=passphrase=topsecret

  # Create a new secret named my-secret from an env file
  oc create secret generic my-secret --from-env-file=path/to/bar.env

oc create secret tls

Create a TLS secret

Example usage
  # Create a new TLS secret named tls-secret with the given key pair:
  oc create secret tls tls-secret --cert=path/to/tls.cert --key=path/to/tls.key

oc create service clusterip

Create a ClusterIP service.

Example usage
  # Create a new ClusterIP service named my-cs
  oc create service clusterip my-cs --tcp=5678:8080

  # Create a new ClusterIP service named my-cs (in headless mode)
  oc create service clusterip my-cs --clusterip="None"

oc create service externalname

Create an ExternalName service.

Example usage
  # Create a new ExternalName service named my-ns
  oc create service externalname my-ns --external-name bar.com

oc create service loadbalancer

Create a LoadBalancer service.

Example usage
  # Create a new LoadBalancer service named my-lbs
  oc create service loadbalancer my-lbs --tcp=5678:8080

oc create service nodeport

Create a NodePort service.

Example usage
  # Create a new NodePort service named my-ns
  oc create service nodeport my-ns --tcp=5678:8080

oc create serviceaccount

Create a service account with the specified name

Example usage
  # Create a new service account named my-service-account
  oc create serviceaccount my-service-account

oc create user

Manually create a user (only needed if automatic creation is disabled)

Example usage
  # Create a user with the username "ajones" and the display name "Adam Jones"
  oc create user ajones --full-name="Adam Jones"

oc create useridentitymapping

Manually map an identity to a user

Example usage
  # Map the identity "acme_ldap:adamjones" to the user "ajones"
  oc create useridentitymapping acme_ldap:adamjones ajones

oc debug

Launch a new instance of a pod for debugging

Example usage
  # Start a shell session into a pod using the OpenShift tools image
  oc debug

  # Debug a currently running deployment by creating a new pod
  oc debug deploy/test

  # Debug a node as an administrator
  oc debug node/master-1

  # Launch a shell in a pod using the provided image stream tag
  oc debug istag/mysql:latest -n openshift

  # Test running a job as a non-root user
  oc debug job/test --as-user=1000000

  # Debug a specific failing container by running the env command in the 'second' container
  oc debug daemonset/test -c second -- /bin/env

  # See the pod that would be created to debug
  oc debug mypod-9xbc -o yaml

  # Debug a resource but launch the debug pod in another namespace
  # Note: Not all resources can be debugged using --to-namespace without modification. For example,
  # volumes and service accounts are namespace-dependent. Add '-o yaml' to output the debug pod definition
  # to disk.  If necessary, edit the definition then run 'oc debug -f -' or run without --to-namespace
  oc debug mypod-9xbc --to-namespace testns

oc delete

Delete resources by filenames, stdin, resources and names, or by resources and label selector

Example usage
  # Delete a pod using the type and name specified in pod.json.
  oc delete -f ./pod.json

  # Delete resources from a directory containing kustomization.yaml - e.g. dir/kustomization.yaml.
  oc delete -k dir

  # Delete a pod based on the type and name in the JSON passed into stdin.
  cat pod.json | oc delete -f -

  # Delete pods and services with same names "baz" and "foo"
  oc delete pod,service baz foo

  # Delete pods and services with label name=myLabel.
  oc delete pods,services -l name=myLabel

  # Delete a pod with minimal delay
  oc delete pod foo --now

  # Force delete a pod on a dead node
  oc delete pod foo --force

  # Delete all pods
  oc delete pods --all

oc describe

Show details of a specific resource or group of resources

Example usage
  # Describe a node
  oc describe nodes kubernetes-node-emt8.c.myproject.internal

  # Describe a pod
  oc describe pods/nginx

  # Describe a pod identified by type and name in "pod.json"
  oc describe -f pod.json

  # Describe all pods
  oc describe pods

  # Describe pods by label name=myLabel
  oc describe po -l name=myLabel

  # Describe all pods managed by the 'frontend' replication controller (rc-created pods
  # get the name of the rc as a prefix in the pod the name).
  oc describe pods frontend

oc diff

Diff live version against would-be applied version

Example usage
  # Diff resources included in pod.json.
  oc diff -f pod.json

  # Diff file read from stdin
  cat service.yaml | oc diff -f -

oc edit

Edit a resource on the server

Example usage
  # Edit the service named 'docker-registry':
  oc edit svc/docker-registry

  # Use an alternative editor
  KUBE_EDITOR="nano" oc edit svc/docker-registry

  # Edit the job 'myjob' in JSON using the v1 API format:
  oc edit job.v1.batch/myjob -o json

  # Edit the deployment 'mydeployment' in YAML and save the modified config in its annotation:
  oc edit deployment/mydeployment -o yaml --save-config

oc ex dockergc

Perform garbage collection to free space in docker storage

Example usage
  # Perform garbage collection with the default settings
  oc ex dockergc

oc exec

Execute a command in a container

Example usage
  # Get output from running 'date' command from pod mypod, using the first container by default
  oc exec mypod -- date

  # Get output from running 'date' command in ruby-container from pod mypod
  oc exec mypod -c ruby-container -- date

  # Switch to raw terminal mode, sends stdin to 'bash' in ruby-container from pod mypod
  # and sends stdout/stderr from 'bash' back to the client
  oc exec mypod -c ruby-container -i -t -- bash -il

  # List contents of /usr from the first container of pod mypod and sort by modification time.
  # If the command you want to execute in the pod has any flags in common (e.g. -i),
  # you must use two dashes (--) to separate your command's flags/arguments.
  # Also note, do not surround your command and its flags/arguments with quotes
  # unless that is how you would execute it normally (i.e., do ls -t /usr, not "ls -t /usr").
  oc exec mypod -i -t -- ls -t /usr

  # Get output from running 'date' command from the first pod of the deployment mydeployment, using the first container by default
  oc exec deploy/mydeployment -- date

  # Get output from running 'date' command from the first pod of the service myservice, using the first container by default
  oc exec svc/myservice -- date

oc explain

Documentation of resources

Example usage
  # Get the documentation of the resource and its fields
  oc explain pods

  # Get the documentation of a specific field of a resource
  oc explain pods.spec.containers

oc expose

Expose a replicated application as a service or route

Example usage
  # Create a route based on service nginx. The new route will reuse nginx's labels
  oc expose service nginx

  # Create a route and specify your own label and route name
  oc expose service nginx -l name=myroute --name=fromdowntown

  # Create a route and specify a host name
  oc expose service nginx --hostname=www.example.com

  # Create a route with a wildcard
  oc expose service nginx --hostname=x.example.com --wildcard-policy=Subdomain
  # This would be equivalent to *.example.com. NOTE: only hosts are matched by the wildcard; subdomains would not be included

  # Expose a deployment configuration as a service and use the specified port
  oc expose dc ruby-hello-world --port=8080

  # Expose a service as a route in the specified path
  oc expose service nginx --path=/nginx

  # Expose a service using different generators
  oc expose service nginx --name=exposed-svc --port=12201 --protocol="TCP" --generator="service/v2"
  oc expose service nginx --name=my-route --port=12201 --generator="route/v1"

  # Exposing a service using the "route/v1" generator (default) will create a new exposed route with the "--name" provided
  # (or the name of the service otherwise). You may not specify a "--protocol" or "--target-port" option when using this generator

oc extract

Extract secrets or config maps to disk

Example usage
  # Extract the secret "test" to the current directory
  oc extract secret/test

  # Extract the config map "nginx" to the /tmp directory
  oc extract configmap/nginx --to=/tmp

  # Extract the config map "nginx" to STDOUT
  oc extract configmap/nginx --to=-

  # Extract only the key "nginx.conf" from config map "nginx" to the /tmp directory
  oc extract configmap/nginx --to=/tmp --keys=nginx.conf

oc get

Display one or many resources

Example usage
  # List all pods in ps output format.
  oc get pods

  # List all pods in ps output format with more information (such as node name).
  oc get pods -o wide

  # List a single replication controller with specified NAME in ps output format.
  oc get replicationcontroller web

  # List deployments in JSON output format, in the "v1" version of the "apps" API group:
  oc get deployments.v1.apps -o json

  # List a single pod in JSON output format.
  oc get -o json pod web-pod-13je7

  # List a pod identified by type and name specified in "pod.yaml" in JSON output format.
  oc get -f pod.yaml -o json

  # List resources from a directory with kustomization.yaml - e.g. dir/kustomization.yaml.
  oc get -k dir/

  # Return only the phase value of the specified pod.
  oc get -o template pod/web-pod-13je7 --template={{.status.phase}}

  # List resource information in custom columns.
  oc get pod test-pod -o custom-columns=CONTAINER:.spec.containers[0].name,IMAGE:.spec.containers[0].image

  # List all replication controllers and services together in ps output format.
  oc get rc,services

  # List one or more resources by their type and names.
  oc get rc/web service/frontend pods/web-pod-13je7

oc idle

Idle scalable resources

Example usage
  # Idle the scalable controllers associated with the services listed in to-idle.txt
  $ oc idle --resource-names-file to-idle.txt

oc image append

Add layers to images and push them to a registry

Example usage
  # Remove the entrypoint on the mysql:latest image
  oc image append --from mysql:latest --to myregistry.com/myimage:latest --image '{"Entrypoint":null}'

  # Add a new layer to the image
  oc image append --from mysql:latest --to myregistry.com/myimage:latest layer.tar.gz

  # Add a new layer to the image and store the result on disk
  # This results in $(pwd)/v2/mysql/blobs,manifests
  oc image append --from mysql:latest --to file://mysql:local layer.tar.gz

  # Add a new layer to the image and store the result on disk in a designated directory
  # This will result in $(pwd)/mysql-local/v2/mysql/blobs,manifests
  oc image append --from mysql:latest --to file://mysql:local --dir mysql-local layer.tar.gz

  # Add a new layer to an image that is stored on disk (~/mysql-local/v2/image exists)
  oc image append --from-dir ~/mysql-local --to myregistry.com/myimage:latest layer.tar.gz

  # Add a new layer to an image that was mirrored to the current directory on disk ($(pwd)/v2/image exists)
  oc image append --from-dir v2 --to myregistry.com/myimage:latest layer.tar.gz

  # Add a new layer to a multi-architecture image for an os/arch that is different from the system's os/arch
  # Note: Wildcard filter is not supported with append. Pass a single os/arch to append
  oc image append --from docker.io/library/busybox:latest --filter-by-os=linux/s390x --to myregistry.com/myimage:latest layer.tar.gz

oc image extract

Copy files from an image to the file system

Example usage
  # Extract the busybox image into the current directory
  oc image extract docker.io/library/busybox:latest

  # Extract the busybox image into a designated directory (must exist)
  oc image extract docker.io/library/busybox:latest --path /:/tmp/busybox

  # Extract the busybox image into the current directory for linux/s390x platform
  # Note: Wildcard filter is not supported with extract. Pass a single os/arch to extract
  oc image extract docker.io/library/busybox:latest --filter-by-os=linux/s390x

  # Extract a single file from the image into the current directory
  oc image extract docker.io/library/centos:7 --path /bin/bash:.

  # Extract all .repo files from the image's /etc/yum.repos.d/ folder into the current directory
  oc image extract docker.io/library/centos:7 --path /etc/yum.repos.d/*.repo:.

  # Extract all .repo files from the image's /etc/yum.repos.d/ folder into a designated directory (must exist)
  # This results in /tmp/yum.repos.d/*.repo on local system
  oc image extract docker.io/library/centos:7 --path /etc/yum.repos.d/*.repo:/tmp/yum.repos.d

  # Extract an image stored on disk into the current directory ($(pwd)/v2/busybox/blobs,manifests exists)
  # --confirm is required because the current directory is not empty
  oc image extract file://busybox:local --confirm

  # Extract an image stored on disk in a directory other than $(pwd)/v2 into the current directory
  # --confirm is required because the current directory is not empty ($(pwd)/busybox-mirror-dir/v2/busybox exists)
  oc image extract file://busybox:local --dir busybox-mirror-dir --confirm

  # Extract an image stored on disk in a directory other than $(pwd)/v2 into a designated directory (must exist)
  oc image extract file://busybox:local --dir busybox-mirror-dir --path /:/tmp/busybox

  # Extract the last layer in the image
  oc image extract docker.io/library/centos:7[-1]

  # Extract the first three layers of the image
  oc image extract docker.io/library/centos:7[:3]

  # Extract the last three layers of the image
  oc image extract docker.io/library/centos:7[-3:]

oc image info

Display information about an image

Example usage
  # Show information about an image
  oc image info quay.io/openshift/cli:latest

  # Show information about images matching a wildcard
  oc image info quay.io/openshift/cli:4.*

  # Show information about a file mirrored to disk under DIR
  oc image info --dir=DIR file://library/busybox:latest

  # Select which image from a multi-OS image to show
  oc image info library/busybox:latest --filter-by-os=linux/arm64

oc image mirror

Mirror images from one repository to another

Example usage
  # Copy image to another tag
  oc image mirror myregistry.com/myimage:latest myregistry.com/myimage:stable

  # Copy image to another registry
  oc image mirror myregistry.com/myimage:latest docker.io/myrepository/myimage:stable

  # Copy all tags starting with mysql to the destination repository
  oc image mirror myregistry.com/myimage:mysql* docker.io/myrepository/myimage

  # Copy image to disk, creating a directory structure that can be served as a registry
  oc image mirror myregistry.com/myimage:latest file://myrepository/myimage:latest

  # Copy image to S3 (pull from <bucket>.s3.amazonaws.com/image:latest)
  oc image mirror myregistry.com/myimage:latest s3://s3.amazonaws.com/<region>/<bucket>/image:latest

  # Copy image to S3 without setting a tag (pull via @<digest>)
  oc image mirror myregistry.com/myimage:latest s3://s3.amazonaws.com/<region>/<bucket>/image

  # Copy image to multiple locations
  oc image mirror myregistry.com/myimage:latest docker.io/myrepository/myimage:stable \
  docker.io/myrepository/myimage:dev

  # Copy multiple images
  oc image mirror myregistry.com/myimage:latest=myregistry.com/other:test \
  myregistry.com/myimage:new=myregistry.com/other:target

  # Copy manifest list of a multi-architecture image, even if only a single image is found
  oc image mirror myregistry.com/myimage:latest=myregistry.com/other:test \
  --keep-manifest-list=true

  # Copy specific os/arch manifest of a multi-architecture image
  # Run 'oc image info myregistry.com/myimage:latest' to see available os/arch for multi-arch images
  # Note that with multi-arch images, this results in a new manifest list digest that includes only
  # the filtered manifests
  oc image mirror myregistry.com/myimage:latest=myregistry.com/other:test \
  --filter-by-os=os/arch

  # Copy all os/arch manifests of a multi-architecture image
  # Run 'oc image info myregistry.com/myimage:latest' to see list of os/arch manifests that will be mirrored
  oc image mirror myregistry.com/myimage:latest=myregistry.com/other:test \
  --keep-manifest-list=true

  # Note the above command is equivalent to
  oc image mirror myregistry.com/myimage:latest=myregistry.com/other:test \
  --filter-by-os=.*

oc import-image

Import images from a container image registry

Example usage
  # Import tag latest into a new image stream
  oc import-image mystream --from=registry.io/repo/image:latest --confirm

  # Update imported data for tag latest in an already existing image stream
  oc import-image mystream

  # Update imported data for tag stable in an already existing image stream
  oc import-image mystream:stable

  # Update imported data for all tags in an existing image stream
  oc import-image mystream --all

  # Import all tags into a new image stream
  oc import-image mystream --from=registry.io/repo/image --all --confirm

  # Import all tags into a new image stream using a custom timeout
  oc --request-timeout=5m import-image mystream --from=registry.io/repo/image --all --confirm

oc kustomize

Build a kustomization target from a directory or URL.

Example usage
  # Build the current working directory
  oc kustomize

  # Build some shared configuration directory
  oc kustomize /home/config/production

  # Build from github
  oc kustomize https://github.com/kubernetes-sigs/kustomize.git/examples/helloWorld?ref=v1.0.6

oc label

Update the labels on a resource

Example usage
  # Update pod 'foo' with the label 'unhealthy' and the value 'true'.
  oc label pods foo unhealthy=true

  # Update pod 'foo' with the label 'status' and the value 'unhealthy', overwriting any existing value.
  oc label --overwrite pods foo status=unhealthy

  # Update all pods in the namespace
  oc label pods --all status=unhealthy

  # Update a pod identified by the type and name in "pod.json"
  oc label -f pod.json status=unhealthy

  # Update pod 'foo' only if the resource is unchanged from version 1.
  oc label pods foo status=unhealthy --resource-version=1

  # Update pod 'foo' by removing a label named 'bar' if it exists.
  # Does not require the --overwrite flag.
  oc label pods foo bar-

oc login

Log in to a server

Example usage
  # Log in interactively
  oc login --username=myuser

  # Log in to the given server with the given certificate authority file
  oc login localhost:8443 --certificate-authority=/path/to/cert.crt

  # Log in to the given server with the given credentials (will not prompt interactively)
  oc login localhost:8443 --username=myuser --password=mypass

oc logout

End the current server session

Example usage
  # Log out
  oc logout

oc logs

Print the logs for a container in a pod

Example usage
  # Start streaming the logs of the most recent build of the openldap build config
  oc logs -f bc/openldap

  # Start streaming the logs of the latest deployment of the mysql deployment config
  oc logs -f dc/mysql

  # Get the logs of the first deployment for the mysql deployment config. Note that logs
  # from older deployments may not exist either because the deployment was successful
  # or due to deployment pruning or manual deletion of the deployment
  oc logs --version=1 dc/mysql

  # Return a snapshot of ruby-container logs from pod backend
  oc logs backend -c ruby-container

  # Start streaming of ruby-container logs from pod backend
  oc logs -f pod/backend -c ruby-container

oc new-app

Create a new application

Example usage
  # List all local templates and image streams that can be used to create an app
  oc new-app --list

  # Create an application based on the source code in the current git repository (with a public remote) and a Docker image
  oc new-app . --docker-image=registry/repo/langimage

  # Create an application myapp with Docker based build strategy expecting binary input
  oc new-app  --strategy=docker --binary --name myapp

  # Create a Ruby application based on the provided [image]~[source code] combination
  oc new-app centos/ruby-25-centos7~https://github.com/sclorg/ruby-ex.git

  # Use the public Docker Hub MySQL image to create an app. Generated artifacts will be labeled with db=mysql
  oc new-app mysql MYSQL_USER=user MYSQL_PASSWORD=pass MYSQL_DATABASE=testdb -l db=mysql

  # Use a MySQL image in a private registry to create an app and override application artifacts' names
  oc new-app --docker-image=myregistry.com/mycompany/mysql --name=private

  # Create an application from a remote repository using its beta4 branch
  oc new-app https://github.com/openshift/ruby-hello-world#beta4

  # Create an application based on a stored template, explicitly setting a parameter value
  oc new-app --template=ruby-helloworld-sample --param=MYSQL_USER=admin

  # Create an application from a remote repository and specify a context directory
  oc new-app https://github.com/youruser/yourgitrepo --context-dir=src/build

  # Create an application from a remote private repository and specify which existing secret to use
  oc new-app https://github.com/youruser/yourgitrepo --source-secret=yoursecret

  # Create an application based on a template file, explicitly setting a parameter value
  oc new-app --file=./example/myapp/template.json --param=MYSQL_USER=admin

  # Search all templates, image streams, and Docker images for the ones that match "ruby"
  oc new-app --search ruby

  # Search for "ruby", but only in stored templates (--template, --image-stream and --docker-image
  # can be used to filter search results)
  oc new-app --search --template=ruby

  # Search for "ruby" in stored templates and print the output as YAML
  oc new-app --search --template=ruby --output=yaml

oc new-build

Create a new build configuration

Example usage
  # Create a build config based on the source code in the current git repository (with a public
  # remote) and a Docker image
  oc new-build . --docker-image=repo/langimage

  # Create a NodeJS build config based on the provided [image]~[source code] combination
  oc new-build centos/nodejs-8-centos7~https://github.com/sclorg/nodejs-ex.git

  # Create a build config from a remote repository using its beta2 branch
  oc new-build https://github.com/openshift/ruby-hello-world#beta2

  # Create a build config using a Dockerfile specified as an argument
  oc new-build -D $'FROM centos:7\nRUN yum install -y httpd'

  # Create a build config from a remote repository and add custom environment variables
  oc new-build https://github.com/openshift/ruby-hello-world -e RACK_ENV=development

  # Create a build config from a remote private repository and specify which existing secret to use
  oc new-build https://github.com/youruser/yourgitrepo --source-secret=yoursecret

  # Create a build config from a remote repository and inject the npmrc into a build
  oc new-build https://github.com/openshift/ruby-hello-world --build-secret npmrc:.npmrc

  # Create a build config from a remote repository and inject environment data into a build
  oc new-build https://github.com/openshift/ruby-hello-world --build-config-map env:config

  # Create a build config that gets its input from a remote repository and another Docker image
  oc new-build https://github.com/openshift/ruby-hello-world --source-image=openshift/jenkins-1-centos7 --source-image-path=/var/lib/jenkins:tmp

oc new-project

Request a new project

Example usage
  # Create a new project with minimal information
  oc new-project web-team-dev

  # Create a new project with a display name and description
  oc new-project web-team-dev --display-name="Web Team Development" --description="Development project for the web team."

oc observe

Observe changes to resources and react to them (experimental)

Example usage
  # Observe changes to services
  oc observe services

  # Observe changes to services, including the clusterIP and invoke a script for each
  oc observe services --template '{ .spec.clusterIP }' -- register_dns.sh

  # Observe changes to services filtered by a label selector
  oc observe namespaces -l regist-dns=true --template '{ .spec.clusterIP }' -- register_dns.sh

oc patch

Update field(s) of a resource

Example usage
  # Partially update a node using a strategic merge patch. Specify the patch as JSON.
  oc patch node k8s-node-1 -p '{"spec":{"unschedulable":true}}'

  # Partially update a node using a strategic merge patch. Specify the patch as YAML.
  oc patch node k8s-node-1 -p $'spec:\n unschedulable: true'

  # Partially update a node identified by the type and name specified in "node.json" using strategic merge patch.
  oc patch -f node.json -p '{"spec":{"unschedulable":true}}'

  # Update a container's image; spec.containers[*].name is required because it's a merge key.
  oc patch pod valid-pod -p '{"spec":{"containers":[{"name":"kubernetes-serve-hostname","image":"new image"}]}}'

  # Update a container's image using a json patch with positional arrays.
  oc patch pod valid-pod --type='json' -p='[{"op": "replace", "path": "/spec/containers/0/image", "value":"new image"}]'

oc policy add-role-to-user

Add a role to users or service accounts for the current project

Example usage
  # Add the 'view' role to user1 for the current project
  oc policy add-role-to-user view user1

  # Add the 'edit' role to serviceaccount1 for the current project
  oc policy add-role-to-user edit -z serviceaccount1

oc policy scc-review

Check which service account can create a pod

Example usage
  # Check whether service accounts sa1 and sa2 can admit a pod with a template pod spec specified in my_resource.yaml
  # Service Account specified in myresource.yaml file is ignored
  oc policy scc-review -z sa1,sa2 -f my_resource.yaml

  # Check whether service accounts system:serviceaccount:bob:default can admit a pod with a template pod spec specified in my_resource.yaml
  oc policy scc-review -z system:serviceaccount:bob:default -f my_resource.yaml

  # Check whether the service account specified in my_resource_with_sa.yaml can admit the pod
  oc policy scc-review -f my_resource_with_sa.yaml

  # Check whether the default service account can admit the pod; default is taken since no service account is defined in myresource_with_no_sa.yaml
  oc policy scc-review -f myresource_with_no_sa.yaml

oc policy scc-subject-review

Check whether a user or a service account can create a pod

Example usage
  # Check whether user bob can create a pod specified in myresource.yaml
  oc policy scc-subject-review -u bob -f myresource.yaml

  # Check whether user bob who belongs to projectAdmin group can create a pod specified in myresource.yaml
  oc policy scc-subject-review -u bob -g projectAdmin -f myresource.yaml

  # Check whether a service account specified in the pod template spec in myresourcewithsa.yaml can create the pod
  oc policy scc-subject-review -f myresourcewithsa.yaml

oc port-forward

Forward one or more local ports to a pod

Example usage
  # Listen on ports 5000 and 6000 locally, forwarding data to/from ports 5000 and 6000 in the pod
  oc port-forward pod/mypod 5000 6000

  # Listen on ports 5000 and 6000 locally, forwarding data to/from ports 5000 and 6000 in a pod selected by the deployment
  oc port-forward deployment/mydeployment 5000 6000

  # Listen on port 8443 locally, forwarding to the targetPort of the service's port named "https" in a pod selected by the service
  oc port-forward service/myservice 8443:https

  # Listen on port 8888 locally, forwarding to 5000 in the pod
  oc port-forward pod/mypod 8888:5000

  # Listen on port 8888 on all addresses, forwarding to 5000 in the pod
  oc port-forward --address 0.0.0.0 pod/mypod 8888:5000

  # Listen on port 8888 on localhost and selected IP, forwarding to 5000 in the pod
  oc port-forward --address localhost,10.19.21.23 pod/mypod 8888:5000

  # Listen on a random port locally, forwarding to 5000 in the pod
  oc port-forward pod/mypod :5000

oc process

Process a template into list of resources

Example usage
  # Convert the template.json file into a resource list and pass to create
  oc process -f template.json | oc create -f -

  # Process a file locally instead of contacting the server
  oc process -f template.json --local -o yaml

  # Process template while passing a user-defined label
  oc process -f template.json -l name=mytemplate

  # Convert a stored template into a resource list
  oc process foo

  # Convert a stored template into a resource list by setting/overriding parameter values
  oc process foo PARM1=VALUE1 PARM2=VALUE2

  # Convert a template stored in different namespace into a resource list
  oc process openshift//foo

  # Convert template.json into a resource list
  cat template.json | oc process -f -

oc project

Switch to another project

Example usage
  # Switch to the 'myapp' project
  oc project myapp

  # Display the project currently in use
  oc project

oc projects

Display existing projects

Example usage
  # List all projects
  oc projects

oc proxy

Run a proxy to the Kubernetes API server

Example usage
  # To proxy all of the kubernetes api and nothing else.
  oc proxy --api-prefix=/

  # To proxy only part of the kubernetes api and also some static files.
  # You can get pods info with 'curl localhost:8001/api/v1/pods'
  oc proxy --www=/my/files --www-prefix=/static/ --api-prefix=/api/

  # To proxy the entire kubernetes api at a different root.
  # You can get pods info with 'curl localhost:8001/custom/api/v1/pods'
  oc proxy --api-prefix=/custom/

  # Run a proxy to kubernetes apiserver on port 8011, serving static content from ./local/www/
  oc proxy --port=8011 --www=./local/www/

  # Run a proxy to kubernetes apiserver on an arbitrary local port.
  # The chosen port for the server will be output to stdout.
  oc proxy --port=0

  # Run a proxy to kubernetes apiserver, changing the api prefix to k8s-api
  # This makes e.g. the pods api available at localhost:8001/k8s-api/v1/pods/
  oc proxy --api-prefix=/k8s-api

oc registry info

Print information about the integrated registry

Example usage
  # Display information about the integrated registry
  oc registry info

oc registry login

Log in to the integrated registry

Example usage
  # Log in to the integrated registry
  oc registry login

  # Log in as the default service account in the current namespace
  oc registry login -z default

  # Log in to different registry using BASIC auth credentials
  oc registry login --registry quay.io/myregistry --auth-basic=USER:PASS

oc replace

Replace a resource by filename or stdin

Example usage
  # Replace a pod using the data in pod.json.
  oc replace -f ./pod.json

  # Replace a pod based on the JSON passed into stdin.
  cat pod.json | oc replace -f -

  # Update a single-container pod's image version (tag) to v4
  oc get pod mypod -o yaml | sed 's/\(image: myimage\):.*$/\1:v4/' | oc replace -f -

  # Force replace, delete and then re-create the resource
  oc replace --force -f ./pod.json

oc rollback

Revert part of an application back to a previous deployment

Example usage
  # Perform a rollback to the last successfully completed deployment for a deployment config
  oc rollback frontend

  # See what a rollback to version 3 will look like, but do not perform the rollback
  oc rollback frontend --to-version=3 --dry-run

  # Perform a rollback to a specific deployment
  oc rollback frontend-2

  # Perform the rollback manually by piping the JSON of the new config back to oc
  oc rollback frontend -o json | oc replace dc/frontend -f -

  # Print the updated deployment configuration in JSON format instead of performing the rollback
  oc rollback frontend -o json

oc rollout cancel

Cancel the in-progress deployment

Example usage
  # Cancel the in-progress deployment based on 'nginx'
  oc rollout cancel dc/nginx

oc rollout history

View rollout history

Example usage
  # View the rollout history of a deployment
  oc rollout history dc/nginx

  # View the details of deployment revision 3
  oc rollout history dc/nginx --revision=3

oc rollout latest

Start a new rollout for a deployment config with the latest state from its triggers

Example usage
  # Start a new rollout based on the latest images defined in the image change triggers
  oc rollout latest dc/nginx

  # Print the rolled out deployment config
  oc rollout latest dc/nginx -o json

oc rollout pause

Mark the provided resource as paused

Example usage
  # Mark the nginx deployment as paused. Any current state of
  # the deployment will continue its function, new updates to the deployment will not
  # have an effect as long as the deployment is paused
  oc rollout pause dc/nginx

oc rollout restart

Restart a resource

Example usage
  # Restart a deployment
  oc rollout restart deployment/nginx

  # Restart a daemonset
  oc rollout restart daemonset/abc

oc rollout resume

Resume a paused resource

Example usage
  # Resume an already paused deployment
  oc rollout resume dc/nginx

oc rollout retry

Retry the latest failed rollout

Example usage
  # Retry the latest failed deployment based on 'frontend'
  # The deployer pod and any hook pods are deleted for the latest failed deployment
  oc rollout retry dc/frontend

oc rollout status

Show the status of the rollout

Example usage
  # Watch the status of the latest rollout
  oc rollout status dc/nginx

oc rollout undo

Undo a previous rollout

Example usage
  # Roll back to the previous deployment
  oc rollout undo dc/nginx

  # Roll back to deployment revision 3. The replication controller for that version must exist
  oc rollout undo dc/nginx --to-revision=3

oc rsh

Start a shell session in a container

Example usage
  # Open a shell session on the first container in pod 'foo'
  oc rsh foo

  # Open a shell session on the first container in pod 'foo' and namespace 'bar'
  # (Note that oc client specific arguments must come before the resource name and its arguments)
  oc rsh -n bar foo

  # Run the command 'cat /etc/resolv.conf' inside pod 'foo'
  oc rsh foo cat /etc/resolv.conf

  # See the configuration of your internal registry
  oc rsh dc/docker-registry cat config.yml

  # Open a shell session on the container named 'index' inside a pod of your job
  oc rsh -c index job/sheduled

oc rsync

Copy files between a local file system and a pod

Example usage
  # Synchronize a local directory with a pod directory
  oc rsync ./local/dir/ POD:/remote/dir

  # Synchronize a pod directory with a local directory
  oc rsync POD:/remote/dir/ ./local/dir

oc run

Run a particular image on the cluster

Example usage
  # Start a nginx pod.
  oc run nginx --image=nginx

  # Start a hazelcast pod and let the container expose port 5701.
  oc run hazelcast --image=hazelcast/hazelcast --port=5701

  # Start a hazelcast pod and set environment variables "DNS_DOMAIN=cluster" and "POD_NAMESPACE=default" in the container.
  oc run hazelcast --image=hazelcast/hazelcast --env="DNS_DOMAIN=cluster" --env="POD_NAMESPACE=default"

  # Start a hazelcast pod and set labels "app=hazelcast" and "env=prod" in the container.
  oc run hazelcast --image=hazelcast/hazelcast --labels="app=hazelcast,env=prod"

  # Dry run. Print the corresponding API objects without creating them.
  oc run nginx --image=nginx --dry-run=client

  # Start a nginx pod, but overload the spec with a partial set of values parsed from JSON.
  oc run nginx --image=nginx --overrides='{ "apiVersion": "v1", "spec": { ... } }'

  # Start a busybox pod and keep it in the foreground, don't restart it if it exits.
  oc run -i -t busybox --image=busybox --restart=Never

  # Start the nginx pod using the default command, but use custom arguments (arg1 .. argN) for that command.
  oc run nginx --image=nginx -- <arg1> <arg2> ... <argN>

  # Start the nginx pod using a different command and custom arguments.
  oc run nginx --image=nginx --command -- <cmd> <arg1> ... <argN>

oc scale

Set a new size for a Deployment, ReplicaSet or Replication Controller

Example usage
  # Scale a replicaset named 'foo' to 3.
  oc scale --replicas=3 rs/foo

  # Scale a resource identified by type and name specified in "foo.yaml" to 3.
  oc scale --replicas=3 -f foo.yaml

  # If the deployment named mysql's current size is 2, scale mysql to 3.
  oc scale --current-replicas=2 --replicas=3 deployment/mysql

  # Scale multiple replication controllers.
  oc scale --replicas=5 rc/foo rc/bar rc/baz

  # Scale statefulset named 'web' to 3.
  oc scale --replicas=3 statefulset/web

Link secrets to a service account

Example usage
  # Add an image pull secret to a service account to automatically use it for pulling pod images
  oc secrets link serviceaccount-name pull-secret --for=pull

  # Add an image pull secret to a service account to automatically use it for both pulling and pushing build images
  oc secrets link builder builder-image-secret --for=pull,mount

  # If the cluster's serviceAccountConfig is operating with limitSecretReferences: True, secrets must be added to the pod's service account whitelist in order to be available to the pod
  oc secrets link pod-sa pod-secret

Detach secrets from a service account

Example usage
  # Unlink a secret currently associated with a service account
  oc secrets unlink serviceaccount-name secret-name another-secret-name ...

oc serviceaccounts create-kubeconfig

Generate a kubeconfig file for a service account

Example usage
  # Create a kubeconfig file for service account 'default'
  oc serviceaccounts create-kubeconfig 'default' > default.kubeconfig

oc serviceaccounts get-token

Get a token assigned to a service account

Example usage
  # Get the service account token from service account 'default'
  oc serviceaccounts get-token 'default'

oc serviceaccounts new-token

Generate a new token for a service account

Example usage
  # Generate a new token for service account 'default'
  oc serviceaccounts new-token 'default'

  # Generate a new token for service account 'default' and apply
  # labels 'foo' and 'bar' to the new token for identification
  oc serviceaccounts new-token 'default' --labels foo=foo-value,bar=bar-value

oc set build-hook

Update a build hook on a build config

Example usage
  # Clear post-commit hook on a build config
  oc set build-hook bc/mybuild --post-commit --remove

  # Set the post-commit hook to execute a test suite using a new entrypoint
  oc set build-hook bc/mybuild --post-commit --command -- /bin/bash -c /var/lib/test-image.sh

  # Set the post-commit hook to execute a shell script
  oc set build-hook bc/mybuild --post-commit --script="/var/lib/test-image.sh param1 param2 && /var/lib/done.sh"

oc set build-secret

Update a build secret on a build config

Example usage
  # Clear the push secret on a build config
  oc set build-secret --push --remove bc/mybuild

  # Set the pull secret on a build config
  oc set build-secret --pull bc/mybuild mysecret

  # Set the push and pull secret on a build config
  oc set build-secret --push --pull bc/mybuild mysecret

  # Set the source secret on a set of build configs matching a selector
  oc set build-secret --source -l app=myapp gitsecret

oc set data

Update the data within a config map or secret

Example usage
  # Set the 'password' key of a secret
  oc set data secret/foo password=this_is_secret

  # Remove the 'password' key from a secret
  oc set data secret/foo password-

  # Update the 'haproxy.conf' key of a config map from a file on disk
  oc set data configmap/bar --from-file=../haproxy.conf

  # Update a secret with the contents of a directory, one key per file
  oc set data secret/foo --from-file=secret-dir

oc set deployment-hook

Update a deployment hook on a deployment config

Example usage
  # Clear pre and post hooks on a deployment config
  oc set deployment-hook dc/myapp --remove --pre --post

  # Set the pre deployment hook to execute a db migration command for an application
  # using the data volume from the application
  oc set deployment-hook dc/myapp --pre --volumes=data -- /var/lib/migrate-db.sh

  # Set a mid deployment hook along with additional environment variables
  oc set deployment-hook dc/myapp --mid --volumes=data -e VAR1=value1 -e VAR2=value2 -- /var/lib/prepare-deploy.sh

oc set env

Update environment variables on a pod template

Example usage
  # Update deployment config 'myapp' with a new environment variable
  oc set env dc/myapp STORAGE_DIR=/local

  # List the environment variables defined on a build config 'sample-build'
  oc set env bc/sample-build --list

  # List the environment variables defined on all pods
  oc set env pods --all --list

  # Output modified build config in YAML
  oc set env bc/sample-build STORAGE_DIR=/data -o yaml

  # Update all containers in all replication controllers in the project to have ENV=prod
  oc set env rc --all ENV=prod

  # Import environment from a secret
  oc set env --from=secret/mysecret dc/myapp

  # Import environment from a config map with a prefix
  oc set env --from=configmap/myconfigmap --prefix=MYSQL_ dc/myapp

  # Remove the environment variable ENV from container 'c1' in all deployment configs
  oc set env dc --all --containers="c1" ENV-

  # Remove the environment variable ENV from a deployment config definition on disk and
  # update the deployment config on the server
  oc set env -f dc.json ENV-

  # Set some of the local shell environment into a deployment config on the server
  oc set env | grep RAILS_ | oc env -e - dc/myapp

oc set image

Update image of a pod template

Example usage
  # Set a deployment configs's nginx container image to 'nginx:1.9.1', and its busybox container image to 'busybox'.
  oc set image dc/nginx busybox=busybox nginx=nginx:1.9.1

  # Set a deployment configs's app container image to the image referenced by the imagestream tag 'openshift/ruby:2.3'.
  oc set image dc/myapp app=openshift/ruby:2.3 --source=imagestreamtag

  # Update all deployments' and rc's nginx container's image to 'nginx:1.9.1'
  oc set image deployments,rc nginx=nginx:1.9.1 --all

  # Update image of all containers of daemonset abc to 'nginx:1.9.1'
  oc set image daemonset abc *=nginx:1.9.1

  # Print result (in yaml format) of updating nginx container image from local file, without hitting the server
  oc set image -f path/to/file.yaml nginx=nginx:1.9.1 --local -o yaml

oc set image-lookup

Change how images are resolved when deploying applications

Example usage
  # Print all of the image streams and whether they resolve local names
  oc set image-lookup

  # Use local name lookup on image stream mysql
  oc set image-lookup mysql

  # Force a deployment to use local name lookup
  oc set image-lookup deploy/mysql

  # Show the current status of the deployment lookup
  oc set image-lookup deploy/mysql --list

  # Disable local name lookup on image stream mysql
  oc set image-lookup mysql --enabled=false

  # Set local name lookup on all image streams
  oc set image-lookup --all

oc set probe

Update a probe on a pod template

Example usage
  # Clear both readiness and liveness probes off all containers
  oc set probe dc/myapp --remove --readiness --liveness

  # Set an exec action as a liveness probe to run 'echo ok'
  oc set probe dc/myapp --liveness -- echo ok

  # Set a readiness probe to try to open a TCP socket on 3306
  oc set probe rc/mysql --readiness --open-tcp=3306

  # Set an HTTP startup probe for port 8080 and path /healthz over HTTP on the pod IP
  oc probe dc/webapp --startup --get-url=http://:8080/healthz

  # Set an HTTP readiness probe for port 8080 and path /healthz over HTTP on the pod IP
  oc probe dc/webapp --readiness --get-url=http://:8080/healthz

  # Set an HTTP readiness probe over HTTPS on 127.0.0.1 for a hostNetwork pod
  oc set probe dc/router --readiness --get-url=https://127.0.0.1:1936/stats

  # Set only the initial-delay-seconds field on all deployments
  oc set probe dc --all --readiness --initial-delay-seconds=30

oc set resources

Update resource requests/limits on objects with pod templates

Example usage
  # Set a deployments nginx container CPU limits to "200m and memory to 512Mi"
  oc set resources deployment nginx -c=nginx --limits=cpu=200m,memory=512Mi

  # Set the resource request and limits for all containers in nginx
  oc set resources deployment nginx --limits=cpu=200m,memory=512Mi --requests=cpu=100m,memory=256Mi

  # Remove the resource requests for resources on containers in nginx
  oc set resources deployment nginx --limits=cpu=0,memory=0 --requests=cpu=0,memory=0

  # Print the result (in YAML format) of updating nginx container limits locally, without hitting the server
  oc set resources -f path/to/file.yaml --limits=cpu=200m,memory=512Mi --local -o yaml

oc set route-backends

Update the backends for a route

Example usage
  # Print the backends on the route 'web'
  oc set route-backends web

  # Set two backend services on route 'web' with 2/3rds of traffic going to 'a'
  oc set route-backends web a=2 b=1

  # Increase the traffic percentage going to b by 10%% relative to a
  oc set route-backends web --adjust b=+10%%

  # Set traffic percentage going to b to 10%% of the traffic going to a
  oc set route-backends web --adjust b=10%%

  # Set weight of b to 10
  oc set route-backends web --adjust b=10

  # Set the weight to all backends to zero
  oc set route-backends web --zero

oc set selector

Set the selector on a resource

Example usage
  # Set the labels and selector before creating a deployment/service pair.
  oc create service clusterip my-svc --clusterip="None" -o yaml --dry-run | oc set selector --local -f - 'environment=qa' -o yaml | oc create -f -
  oc create deployment my-dep -o yaml --dry-run | oc label --local -f - environment=qa -o yaml | oc create -f -

oc set serviceaccount

Update ServiceAccount of a resource

Example usage
  # Set deployment nginx-deployment's service account to serviceaccount1
  oc set serviceaccount deployment nginx-deployment serviceaccount1

  # Print the result (in YAML format) of updated nginx deployment with service account from a local file, without hitting the API server
  oc set sa -f nginx-deployment.yaml serviceaccount1 --local --dry-run -o yaml

oc set subject

Update User, Group or ServiceAccount in a RoleBinding/ClusterRoleBinding

Example usage
  # Update a cluster role binding for serviceaccount1
  oc set subject clusterrolebinding admin --serviceaccount=namespace:serviceaccount1

  # Update a role binding for user1, user2, and group1
  oc set subject rolebinding admin --user=user1 --user=user2 --group=group1

  # Print the result (in YAML format) of updating role binding subjects locally, without hitting the server
  oc create rolebinding admin --role=admin --user=admin -o yaml --dry-run | oc set subject --local -f - --user=foo -o yaml

oc set triggers

Update the triggers on one or more objects

Example usage
  # Print the triggers on the deployment config 'myapp'
  oc set triggers dc/myapp

  # Set all triggers to manual
  oc set triggers dc/myapp --manual

  # Enable all automatic triggers
  oc set triggers dc/myapp --auto

  # Reset the GitHub webhook on a build to a new, generated secret
  oc set triggers bc/webapp --from-github
  oc set triggers bc/webapp --from-webhook

  # Remove all triggers
  oc set triggers bc/webapp --remove-all

  # Stop triggering on config change
  oc set triggers dc/myapp --from-config --remove

  # Add an image trigger to a build config
  oc set triggers bc/webapp --from-image=namespace1/image:latest

  # Add an image trigger to a stateful set on the main container
  oc set triggers statefulset/db --from-image=namespace1/image:latest -c main

oc set volumes

Update volumes on a pod template

Example usage
  # List volumes defined on all deployment configs in the current project
  oc set volume dc --all

  # Add a new empty dir volume to deployment config (dc) 'myapp' mounted under
  # /var/lib/myapp
  oc set volume dc/myapp --add --mount-path=/var/lib/myapp

  # Use an existing persistent volume claim (pvc) to overwrite an existing volume 'v1'
  oc set volume dc/myapp --add --name=v1 -t pvc --claim-name=pvc1 --overwrite

  # Remove volume 'v1' from deployment config 'myapp'
  oc set volume dc/myapp --remove --name=v1

  # Create a new persistent volume claim that overwrites an existing volume 'v1'
  oc set volume dc/myapp --add --name=v1 -t pvc --claim-size=1G --overwrite

  # Change the mount point for volume 'v1' to /data
  oc set volume dc/myapp --add --name=v1 -m /data --overwrite

  # Modify the deployment config by removing volume mount "v1" from container "c1"
  # (and by removing the volume "v1" if no other containers have volume mounts that reference it)
  oc set volume dc/myapp --remove --name=v1 --containers=c1

  # Add new volume based on a more complex volume source (AWS EBS, GCE PD,
  # Ceph, Gluster, NFS, ISCSI, ...)
  oc set volume dc/myapp --add -m /data --source=<json-string>

oc start-build

Start a new build

Example usage
  # Starts build from build config "hello-world"
  oc start-build hello-world

  # Starts build from a previous build "hello-world-1"
  oc start-build --from-build=hello-world-1

  # Use the contents of a directory as build input
  oc start-build hello-world --from-dir=src/

  # Send the contents of a Git repository to the server from tag 'v2'
  oc start-build hello-world --from-repo=../hello-world --commit=v2

  # Start a new build for build config "hello-world" and watch the logs until the build
  # completes or fails
  oc start-build hello-world --follow

  # Start a new build for build config "hello-world" and wait until the build completes. It
  # exits with a non-zero return code if the build fails
  oc start-build hello-world --wait

oc status

Show an overview of the current project

Example usage
  # See an overview of the current project
  oc status

  # Export the overview of the current project in an svg file
  oc status -o dot | dot -T svg -o project.svg

  # See an overview of the current project including details for any identified issues
  oc status --suggest

oc tag

Tag existing images into image streams

Example usage
  # Tag the current image for the image stream 'openshift/ruby' and tag '2.0' into the image stream 'yourproject/ruby with tag 'tip'
  oc tag openshift/ruby:2.0 yourproject/ruby:tip

  # Tag a specific image
  oc tag openshift/ruby@sha256:6b646fa6bf5e5e4c7fa41056c27910e679c03ebe7f93e361e6515a9da7e258cc yourproject/ruby:tip

  # Tag an external container image
  oc tag --source=docker openshift/origin-control-plane:latest yourproject/ruby:tip

  # Tag an external container image and request pullthrough for it
  oc tag --source=docker openshift/origin-control-plane:latest yourproject/ruby:tip --reference-policy=local

  # Remove the specified spec tag from an image stream
  oc tag openshift/origin-control-plane:latest -d

oc version

Print the client and server version information

Example usage
  # Print the OpenShift client, kube-apiserver, and openshift-apiserver version information for the current context
  oc version

  # Print the OpenShift client, kube-apiserver, and openshift-apiserver version numbers for the current context
  oc version --short

  # Print the OpenShift client version information for the current context
  oc version --client

oc wait

Experimental: Wait for a specific condition on one or many resources.

Example usage
  # Wait for the pod "busybox1" to contain the status condition of type "Ready".
  oc wait --for=condition=Ready pod/busybox1

  # The default value of status condition is true, you can set false.
  oc wait --for=condition=Ready=false pod/busybox1

  # Wait for the pod "busybox1" to be deleted, with a timeout of 60s, after having issued the "delete" command.
  oc delete pod/busybox1
  oc wait --for=delete pod/busybox1 --timeout=60s

oc whoami

Return information about the current session

Example usage
  # Display the currently authenticated user
  oc whoami